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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
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The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,8041923,074 (4.5)153
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» See also 153 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 187 (next | show all)
*whispers* The movie was better than the book.

Okay, now that you're done throwing things at me, I still think this was an important read. Starr is a 16 year old black girl who watches her friend die in an another incident in a long line of police brutality and deals with the fallout personally, emotionally, mentally, etc. We watch as she navigates her familial relationships, her friendships, her romantic relationship with her boyfriend (who also happens to be white) and the greater societal relationships.

It's an important book. I think a lot of the negative reviews really miss the entire point and actually demonstrate WHY we need books like this. I can't claim to understand Starr's experiences but I've read and watched enough to understand why they talk about "Black Jesus" or why they make fun of white people (and how it is NOT reverse racism), etc. This discomfort on display is something some people need to work through which, again, is part of the reason why this book has been so highly discussed.

That said, I also don't think as a *book* to read (excluding the greater impact it has, the discussions it has raised) was that great and this was an example of an okay book that made for an excellent adaption. Starr as a character is great. I thought she was written really well and was well-formed as a character with a great voice (at 16 and after watching two of your friends die by violent means she's not always going to be okay or "put together" or whatever). But while there are great moments and sections, there's also a lot that could have been cut down.

It could be that we're looking at an inner story of a teenager who wouldn't need a filter (especially in this day and age of social media) but sometimes there were parts that went on too long, too much detail, etc.

I also somewhat wonder if it may contribute to some of the negative reviews: the movie takes its time to establish Starr as a character and how she navigates the world whereas the book opens with the shooting. A lot of people, unfortunately, only see black people through this lens of violence. While it says a lot more about them than the book or movie, I can't help but wonder if that might have something to do with it.

I'm glad I read it and I was happy to buy it, although I might not do so for her next book. This should be reasonably easy to access at your local library or bookstore. ( )
  acciolibros | Feb 19, 2019 |
Stands on its own strengths as warm, emotional and uplifting fiction (the YA emotional intensity aside). But, its added value from its depiction of the lives of Black people in the US makes this book a must read ( )
  RekhainBC | Feb 15, 2019 |
Very well done. ( )
  cmt100 | Feb 15, 2019 |
This book is so well written, I’m enjoying the style, but I just can’t get into the story without being mad.
I’m going to get so much hate for this.
BUT!
I think it’s ridiculous when people make such a big deal about race. Yes, there are discriminatory issues in our world, but making such a big deal out of it makes it worse! I’ve grown up with black kids who have been some of my best friends, and never thought they were different because of their skin color. We are all people, no matter our race!
Star treats her white friends horribly, because they’re white. Because they won’t understand, because they don’t have to worry about being discriminated against. But what is she doing there? She’s judging THEM based on their skin color.
I just can’t do it. Yes this is an issue in our world, but putting so much focus on it just inflames people into making it such a big deal!
I’m sorry for the cops! I am! They try so hard to do their job, and people give them crap. No I’m not saying them shooting people is right, but imagine how you would feel if you had people constantly disrespecting you and treating you like crap because of your job! Just like all these people say they’re treated like crap because of their skin color.

I will not be replying to ANY comments on here, so please, don’t try to start an argument with me. I’m just saying my piece. I see the other side of the issue, but I don’t believe it’s right to act this way. I apologize to anyone who sees differently.
  kat_the_bookcat | Feb 7, 2019 |
Starr struggles to find a balance between her life at an affluent private school and her home life in an impoverished neighborhood. She knows who she is but feels she has to hide parts of herself in order to fit in. Starr becomes a witness to a childhood friend's death by the hands of a police officer and has to decide whether or not to stand out and stand up for what she believes. ( )
  lauraedavis | Jan 31, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 187 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angie Thomasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cartwright, DebraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mutsaers, JasperTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stempel, JennaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turpin, BahniNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

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Book description
Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does-or does not-say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062498533, Hardcover)

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Angie Thomas’s searing debut about an ordinary girl in extraordinary circumstances addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty. Soon to be a major motion picture from Fox 2000/Temple Hill Productions.

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

(retrieved from Amazon Tue, 03 Jan 2017 10:50:39 -0500)

(see all 2 descriptions)

After witnessing her friend's death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter's life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died.

» see all 6 descriptions

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