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We Are Legion (We Are Bob)

by Dennis E. Taylor

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Bobiverse (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6703623,827 (4.02)149
Bob Johansson has just sold his software company and is looking forward to a life of leisure. There are places to go, books to read, and movies to watch. So it's a little unfair when he gets himself killed crossing the street. Bob wakes up a century later to find that corpsicles have been declared to be without rights, and he is now the property of the state. He has been uploaded into computer hardware and is slated to be the controlling AI in an interstellar probe looking for habitable planets. The stakes are high: no less than the first claim to entire worlds. If he declines the honor, he'll be switched off, and they'll try again with someone else. If he accepts, he becomes a prime target. There are at least three other countries trying to get their own probes launched first, and they play dirty. The safest place for Bob is in space, heading away from Earth at top speed. Or so he thinks. Because the universe is full of nasties, and trespassers make them mad - very mad.… (more)

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» See also 149 mentions

English (35)  German (1)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
I'm jumping on the Bobwagon here!

I love the light tone throughout and the geek humor mostly relegated to names one AI clone gives to oneself when faced with a profundity of oneself. Riker? Number 2. Of course. But the rest is just a fantastic ride of popular references and snark, right, Admiral Akbar?

Seriously, that was just one of the coolest things in the novel... but the next runner-up has got to be the effortless way we start colonizing the galaxy with each replicant, going back to Earth, exploring the star systems, finding aliens, and of course fighting one little pernicious Brazilian who is racing Bob among the stars and who happens to be a rather dedicated idiot.

Oh, humanity is practically wiped out. At least he still has his mission! Sheesh.

While this is a light book, it's full of great voice and activity and comradeship between oneself. :) Truly surprising just how much we can argue with ourself when we have a whole universe to grow within. I'm trying to find fault with Arthur, but I just can't.

This is delicious SF fun and I have to say it's totally accessible for anyone. It may be appreciated more by geeks, however. :)

( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Funny, and adventurous, this is a more a collection of space exploration scenarios connected by all the adventurers being copies of the original Bob. ( )
  quondame | May 31, 2020 |
I'd read the reviews before reading this book and they were extremely positive. Almost to the point of hyping it too much.

Ohh...but this book is so worth it. In one of the reviews, it said this was the perfect combination between the Martian and Old Man's War. That is an extremely apt observation. It takes a little while to get there, but hits it in spades.

If you like space exploration and a cheeky main character, this is the book for you! ( )
  cgfaulknerog | May 28, 2020 |
I did like the book, and it was a quick read and the world building was cool, but some aspects just kind of bugged me while reading and that's why I gave it three stars. It was a creative story in that our lead character is an AI based upon a human consciousness. It also recognizes some of the worst aspects of humanity -- our division and discord and self-destructive nature. The story was lively and easy to read. The science fiction didn't get to detailed but was just enough to make it fun.

All that said, I didn't like that it only had two female characters, and minor characters at that, even though opportunities existed to allow for more. For a book written in 2016, that just could have been improved upon. I also think the lead character/characters were rather immature and some of the dialogue represented that immaturity. Yes, the character acknowledged this aspect of himself but it still didn't sit right with me. Lastly, all the cultural references of our generation was a little overboard. It was fun at first but then it went on and on. In terms of cultural references, it was similar to [b:Ready Player One|9969571|Ready Player One (Ready Player One, #1)|Ernest Cline|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1500930947s/9969571.jpg|14863741] but that book had way more diversity (music, games, movies, etc) and this book was quite narrowly focused on SciFi themes only. Happy have read it, but I won't continue reading in the series. ( )
  kenley | May 7, 2020 |
This book was totally out of my wheelhouse but I loved it!

Bob is a tech genius comparable to Bill Gates. He decides to get himself, (well, his head), cryogenically frozen and signs a contract to have it done. Shortly thereafter, he's hit by a car and the contract kicks in.

When he wakes up, it's centuries later and as a sentient computer. He's in charge of, (basically), saving humanity. He goes about this task by cloning himself, as he was made to do, (see Von Neumann probes), and spreading throughout the universe(s). He, (it), (Bobs), does this with humor, compassion and all kinds of science fiction references that cracked me up.

A total aside: my husband was watching the Science Channel the other night and the show was talking about 3D printers and I asked if Von Neumann probes were mentioned. He looked at me as if I were a nut. No, he said. Two minutes later the show went into what they were and how they would work and I puffed up with pride. (Picture Fredo Corleone: "I'm smart!")

Ray Porter is a fantastic narrator and I enjoyed hearing him voice the different faces of Bob: (Riker, Homer and Admiral Akbar), to name a few. I'm not sure I would have enjoyed this book as much if I had read it instead of listening. That said, bring on book two!

( )
  Charrlygirl | Mar 22, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Taylor, Dennis E.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Porter, RayNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
I would like to dedicate this book to my wife, Blaihin, who not only puts up with my writing but supports it, and to my daughter Tina, who completed our family.
First words
"So...You'll cut my head off."
Quotations
Yeah, they still make duct tape. And it still holds the universe together.
The ship would have to rotate on its center of mass to aim, and I'd have to cut off the drive momentarily when firing, but it was considerably better than my current defensive armament,which consisted of harsh words and heavy disapproval. Probably not effective against Klingons.
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Book description
Bob Johansson has just sold his software company and is looking forward to a life of leisure. There are places to go, books to read, and movies to watch. So it's a little unfair when he gets himself killed crossing the street.

Bob wakes up a century later to find that corpsicles have been declared to be without rights, and he is now the property of the state. He has been uploaded into computer hardware and is slated to be the controlling AI in an interstellar probe looking for habitable planets. The stakes are high: no less than the first claim to entire worlds. If he declines the honor, he'll be switched off, and they'll try again with someone else. If he accepts, he becomes a prime target. There are at least three other countries trying to get their own probes launched first, and they play dirty.

The safest place for Bob is in space, heading away from Earth at top speed. Or so he thinks. Because the universe is full of nasties, and trespassers make them mad - very mad.
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