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Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition

by Margot Lee Shetterly

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6081427,661 (4.31)9
Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as "Human Computers," calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. Segregated from their white counterparts by Jim Crow laws, these "colored computers," as they were known, used slide rules, adding machines, and pencil and paper to support America's fledgling aeronautics industry, and helped write the equations that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Drawing on the oral histories of scores of these "computers," personal recollections, interviews with NASA executives and engineers, archival documents, correspondence, and reporting from the era, Hidden Figures recalls America's greatest adventure and NASA's groundbreaking successes through the experiences of five spunky, courageous, intelligent, determined, and patriotic women: Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, Christine Darden, and Gloria Champine. Moving from World War II through NASA's golden age, touching on the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the women's rights movement, Hidden Figures interweaves a history of scientific achievement and technological innovation with the intimate stories of five women whose work forever changed the world -- and whose lives show how out of one of America's most painful histories came one of its proudest moments.… (more)

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Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This book is about four women, Dorothy Vaughan, Christine Darden, Katherine Johnson and Mary Jackson. It tells how these worm went through discrimination by white male engineers. They were given data from these men and provided calculations to them with how to reach the moon and back before the soviets did which was a major priority during that time. Defeating adversity is such a highlight in this book especially because the main reason we reached the moon is because of these of these four incredible unrecognized women. This book can be used in a classroom to show students that perseverance and determination goes a long way and no matter what obstacles stand in your way that anything is possible. ( )
  Madeleine_Collins | Apr 6, 2020 |
Such a great read! ( )
  slmr4242 | Oct 16, 2019 |
Four black women used what they had on the inside to prove that they were better than what people thought of them when they look at them from the outside. These women went through discrimination, but still proved themselves despite the tough conditions. They provided the calculations from the data that the white male engineers didn’t want to do or did not have enough time to do it. Finding a way to get to the moon and back before the Soviets was their number one priority. They worked late nights, did calculations that took nearly a month, and fought against discrimination at the same time. The white males overlooked these women’s abilities and we would have probably gotten to the moon a lot sooner if they were treated equally and fairly. The work they did proved themselves eventually when the first humans stepped on the moon on July 20, 1969. They won the Space Race against the Soviets mainly because of these four unrecognized women.

This book was amazingly put together, it was seen that the author put time and research into this book. I am really interested in NACA or NASA and its history so this book was a good suit for me. Some parts of the book got boring and tedious, but once you chew through that, it gets interesting. This book got really fast paced at the end, I would suggest to spread it out over the entire book instead of just the last couple of pages. Other then that, I really enjoyed this book. It went into depth of these women’s discriminated lives and how they put up with it. Their accomplishments should be recognized throughout the entire world. Overall, this book gets a 4 out of 5. ( )
  POsadsky.ELA5 | Oct 6, 2019 |
Interesting, but I admit to skimming parts. ( )
1 vote miri12 | May 31, 2019 |
Love, Loved this book. This story is amazing. It left me with wanting to learn more. Thank you so much for sharing this! ( )
  cfulton20 | Dec 5, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
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Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as "Human Computers," calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. Segregated from their white counterparts by Jim Crow laws, these "colored computers," as they were known, used slide rules, adding machines, and pencil and paper to support America's fledgling aeronautics industry, and helped write the equations that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Drawing on the oral histories of scores of these "computers," personal recollections, interviews with NASA executives and engineers, archival documents, correspondence, and reporting from the era, Hidden Figures recalls America's greatest adventure and NASA's groundbreaking successes through the experiences of five spunky, courageous, intelligent, determined, and patriotic women: Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, Christine Darden, and Gloria Champine. Moving from World War II through NASA's golden age, touching on the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the women's rights movement, Hidden Figures interweaves a history of scientific achievement and technological innovation with the intimate stories of five women whose work forever changed the world -- and whose lives show how out of one of America's most painful histories came one of its proudest moments.

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