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Grains: Resources by William Winders
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Grains: Resources

by William Winders

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0745688047, Paperback)

Grains - particularly maize, rice, and wheat - are the central component of most people’s diets, but we rarely stop to think about the wider role they play in national and international policy-making, as well as global issues like food security, biotechnology, and even climate change.
 
But why are grains so important and ubiquitous? What political conflicts and economic processes underlie this dominance?  Who controls the world’s supply of grains and with what outcomes?  In this timely book, Bill Winders unravels the complex story of feed and food grains in the global economy.  Highlighting the importance of corporate control and divisions between grains - such as who grows them, and who consumes them - he shows how grains do not represent a unitary political and economic force.  Whilst the differences between them may seem small, they can lead to competing economic interests and policy preferences with serious and, on occasions, violent geopolitical consequences.
 
This richly detailed and authoritative guide will be of interest to students across the social sciences, as well as anyone interested in current affairs.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 24 Nov 2016 09:38:39 -0500)

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