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The Raven (Dover Fine Art, History of Art)…
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The Raven (Dover Fine Art, History of Art)

by Gustave Dore

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Stuck between not wanting to forget and not wanting to remember, I think we have all felt that at least once in our lives, is the madness that devotion and loss can cause a humans mind.

The classic narrative poem by Poe about a talking Raven. On a rather depressing December night the narrator is trying to heal his heart from the death of his beloved Lenore by reading near a fire. He hears a tapping at his door but nothing is there. Upon the second tapping he realizes it is coming from his window. The raven flies in and the man asks its name. The only response from the Raven is nevermore. The narrator is surprised that the raven can talk wallowing in the fact that like like everything else in his life, will leave him. The raven speaks "Nevermore" again, leaving the narrator assuming that the bird learned the word from a forlorn owner. The narrator pull his chair closer to the raven but his mind wanders back to Lenore. The bird again speaks "Nevermore" making the narrator feel he can never escape his memories. Enraged he calls the raven an evil prophet. He asks the raven if he will be reunited with Lenore in the afterlife and again the raven replies Nevermore enhancing the narrators rage. He shouts at the bird that it's a liar and commands the bird to leave and stayed. The narrator thinks that his soul is trapped in the ravens shadow and shall be lifted nevermore. ( )
  Jychelle88 | Oct 16, 2017 |
The way the poem flows is beautiful. It makes you want to keep reading. And the illustrations are gorgeous.

A dark poem about a man who has lost his love, Lenore. He hears someone knocking at his chamber door, but when he opens it there is no one there. He then opens the window and in flies the raven. To every question the man asks the raven the answer is always "nevermore".

The man's madness is palpable.
( )
  jenn88 | Apr 25, 2017 |
flows so wonderfully ( )
  ToniFGMAMTC | Jan 19, 2017 |
flows so wonderfully ( )
  ToniFGMAMTC | Jan 19, 2017 |
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All 27 of Doré's detailed, masterly engravings from a rare 19th-century edition of The Raven, among the most popular American poems ever written. Dreamlike, otherworldly illustrations perfectly capture the bleak despair and mournful musings of Poe's poem. Apposite quotations from the poem are printed on facing pages; complete text is also included.… (more)

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