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Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig
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Ginny Moon (2017)

by Benjamin Ludwig

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I picked up this book from the local library to read for November's pick of @diversebookclub. All opinions are my own. 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig is amazing insight into autistic children. Their minds just keep going and going. They focus and can't think of anything else except that goal right then. It's always planning and thinking of how to reach that goal, even if that plan doesn't make since to anyone else. This story was amazing and I can't wait to get on Goodreads discussions! Review also posted on Instagram @jasonnstacie, Goodreads/StacieBoren, and my blog at readsbystacie.com. ( )
  SBoren | Oct 29, 2017 |
*I received a copy of this book from the publisher.*

A decent read written from the perspective of an autistic teenage girl. While Ginny Moon has a better life now that she's been adopted by a stable family, she remains concerned about the little sister she left behind. Not understanding that the infant sister she left behind is now six years old, Ginny is determined to return to her birth mother to care for the baby she knows her mother's not contempt to care for. A good story about how Ginny learns to advocate for herself and communicate what she needs to those around her. ( )
  wagner.sarah35 | Oct 7, 2017 |
Autism seems to be male-centric in fiction, maybe making sense since a higher percentage of males are afflicted IRL. So this affecting novel, featuring a teenage adopted girl with autism, is a welcome change. There's a lot of pain flowing through, and if the author resembles the father in the story, it's because he and his wife, too, are those adoptive parents. Ginny comes to them as a foster child and seems to be settling in with her "Forever Family" until they become birth parents to a daughter, and then it all falls apart in a most disastrous way.

The entire PoV is Ginny's, and both her internal voice and her outward actions are both fascinating and frustrating. She cannot let go of her earlier miserable life with her own birth mother, as a result of her brain issues and her concerns about who else was left behind when she was removed from a home rife with starvation and abuse. The narrative moves along smoothly and the reader becomes immersed in the plot and in Ginny's growing power over herself and her self-knowledge. Heartstrings are deeply plucked in this memorable tale. ( )
  froxgirl | Aug 31, 2017 |
Read all in a sitting, though I had to keep jumping up and walking around to relieve the stress. Ludwig is so insightful and uncompromising. I felt like I had a real insider's view of autism. Heartbreaking, horrifying, tender. ( )
1 vote quirkylibrarian | Aug 23, 2017 |
This is the tale of Ginny Moon, a teenager with autism. She lives with her adoptive parents but worries endlessly about her Baby Doll who she left with her "unreliable" birth mother.

I had mixed feelings about this book for a while because I felt the author had made Ginny seem too stupid. Being autistic shouldn't mean she's stupid, just has glitches in her thinking. I also worried about several of the other characters' actions and attitudes. Even when I was concerned about that, I found myself totally caught up in the story because the plot and the characters are gripping. Eventually I also got over my frustration with Ginny's misunderstandings/lack of understanding...She mainly hadn't learned to ask for clarification or for information and of course some things, including looping obsessive thoughts, are typical of autism.

Thank you, Benjamin Ludwig, for this poignant, fast-moving novel that reminds us all of the difficulties of many children and for the need for foster parents and understanding for autistic children. ( )
  Connie-D | Jul 21, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0778330168, Hardcover)

Meet Ginny Moon. She's mostly your average teenager—she plays flute in the school band, has weekly basketball practice and reads Robert Frost poems for English class. But Ginny is autistic. And so what's important to her might seem a bit…different: starting every day with exactly nine grapes for breakfast, Michael Jackson, taking care of her baby doll and crafting a Big Secret Plan of escape. 

Ginny has been in foster care for years, and for the first time in her life, she has found her "forever home"—a place where she'll be safe and protected, with a family who will love and nurture her. Though this is exactly the kind of home that all foster kids are hoping for, Ginny has other plans. She'll steal and lie and reach across her past to exploit the good intentions of those who love her—anything it takes to get back what's missing in her life. She'll even try to get herself kidnapped. 

Told in an extraordinary and wholly original voice, The Original Ginny Moon is at once quirky, charming, bighearted, poignant and yet also heartbreaking and a bit dark. It's a story of a journey, about being an outsider trying to find a place to belong and about making sense of a world that just doesn't seem to add up.

(retrieved from Amazon Sat, 03 Dec 2016 17:19:02 -0500)

Meet Ginny Moon. She's mostly your average teenager--she plays flute in the high school band, has weekly basketball practice, and reads Robert Frost poems in English class. But Ginny is autistic. And so what's important to her might seem a bit... different: starting every day with exactly nine grapes for breakfast, Michael Jackson, her baby doll, and crafting a secret plan of escape. After being traumatically taken from her abusive birth mother and moved around to different homes, Ginny has finally found her "forever home"--a safe place with parents who will love and nurture her. This is exactly what all foster kids are hoping for, right? But Ginny has other plans. She'll steal and lie and exploit the good intentions of those who love her--anything it takes to get back what's missing in her life. She'll even try to get herself kidnapped. Told in an extraordinary and wholly original voice, Ginny Moon is at once quirky, charming, heartbreaking, and poignant. It's a story about being an outsider trying to find a place to belong and about making sense of a world that just doesn't seem to add up. Taking you into the mind of a curious and deeply human character, Benjamin Ludwig's novel affirms that fiction has the power to change the way we see the world.… (more)

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