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The Dark Room by Jonathan Moore
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The Dark Room (2017)

by Jonathan Moore

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This is the first book by this author I have read, and wow! I will definitely search out other books by him.
The premise as it was described on the book sounded good, the mayor of San Francisco, is being blackmailed, and the only way the black mailer will let up is if the mayor kills himself. What I didn't expect was it to be such a police procedural book, but for the first time in a long time the story was told expertly, and not boring or predictably. Even better is the author's writing and the noir atmosphere, the city takes on with the dark clouds, heavy rain, and dense fog.
This is a great murder mystery. ( )
  zmagic69 | May 30, 2017 |
This is a police procedural and it’s a good one. I couldn’t find any fault with the investigation in technique or plausibility (except that there's a less risky way to check if a camera has film in it). Gavin Cain is a good detective. I liked the distinction Moore made between him and Nagata; he an investigator, she an administrator. Later it made her easy to suspect and that was kind of fun, too. Moore portrayed his cops in an even-handed way. Karen Fischer was drawn well and I liked how she and Cain played off each other. It was straight up cop work though, nothing gooey. That was saved for his relationship with Lucy which I really couldn’t stand a lot of. She’s the requisite damaged woman for him to rescue and/or fix. He’s done one and is trying to do the other. She’s annoying and distracting. As much as I liked Cain (and the reappearance of Henry Newcomb from The Poison Artist) I don’t think I’ll follow things if it becomes a series because of Lucy. And what is it with that name? I’ve never met any one named Lucy in my entire life. It’s like Jack and gray eyes - they mostly exist in fiction. ( )
  Bookmarque | Mar 8, 2017 |
It was the cover of Jonathan Moore's new book, The Dark Room, that initially caught my eye. (Yep, dark and ominous appeals to me.....) I was unaware of Moore as an author before this book, but after reading The Dark Room, I've added him to my list of 'must be read' authors.

Gavin Cain is an San Francisco PD detective. He's attending an exhumation that he hopes will clear one of his cases when he is abruptly pulled away. The mayor need the best detective SFPD has. Why? Well, someone has sent him pictures. Pictures of a woman in - well, let's just say, in danger. The mayor claims not to know why the pics have been sent to him or who the woman is. He just wants the sender found and punished.

Well, Cain will take the case, but he'll solve it on his terms, not the Mayor's. Cain is such a great character - sharp, smart, following his own intuition, somewhat grumpy but determined. But Moore adds a bit more to Cain - his personal life is just as intriguing. His girlfriend is a former crime victim and agoraphobic. An unusual and appealing storyline. Moore gives us a good supporting cast as well - but I was a bit shocked (and disappointed) at the turn things took for one of those characters.

Moore's plotting is fantastic, intricate and detailed. The reader is along for the ride as Cain investigates. I like having no 'insider' knowledge in a police procedural. It's fun to take the pieces given and see if I can figure things out before the final pages. Did I? No, but I sure enjoyed trying.

Those who enjoy a good - really good - police procedural will want to pick up The Dark Room. ( )
  Twink | Jan 30, 2017 |
The seeming black mail of a mayor. A disinterred grave with a horrifying discovery inside, a dysfunctional family, and secrets long thought buried come to light. This author and I, his writing style, his characters, get along very well. Although different in feel and tome than his previous novel, which I loved, I found this one equally engaging.

Gavin Cane, homicide detective, is an interesting and likable character. His dogged personality and his ability to put things together has served him well. His relationship with Annie, fraught with anxiety, is also unusual. The author does not use a heavy handed approach in fleshing out his lead character, leaving the reader a chance to form their own opinions.

Evenly paced, enjoyable reading that is not horribly graphic, this has become one of my new favorite series. Can't wait to read the next one.

ARC from publisher.. ( )
  Beamis12 | Jan 22, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0544784677, Hardcover)

"Suspense that never stops.  If you like Michael Connelly’s novels, you will gobble up Jonathan Moore’s The Dark Room.” James Patterson 

A heart-pounding thriller from an “electrifying”* author that shows what happens when our deepest secrets are unburied.
 
*Stephen King


Gavin Cain, an SFPD homicide inspector, is in the middle of an exhumation when his phone rings. San Francisco’s mayor is being blackmailed and has ordered Cain back to the city; a helicopter is on its way. The casket, and Cain’s cold-case investigation, must wait. 
 
At City Hall, the mayor shows Cain four photographs he’s received: the first, an unforgettable blonde; the second, pills and handcuffs on a nightstand; the third, the woman drinking from a flask; and last, the woman naked, unconscious, and shackled to a bed. The accompanying letter is straightforward: worse revelations are on the way unless the mayor takes his own life first. 
 
An intricately plotted, deeply affecting thriller that keeps readers guessing until the final pages, The Dark Room tracks Cain as he hunts for the blackmailer, pitching him into the web of destruction and devotion the mayor casts in his shadow. 
 

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 09 Jan 2017 11:17:03 -0500)

""Suspense that never stops. If you like Michael Connelly's novels, you will gobble up Jonathan Moore's The Dark Room." --James Patterson ; The heart-pounding follow-up to the "electrifying" Poison Artist shows what happens when our deepest secrets are unburied." --Stephen King ; Gavin Cain, an SFPD homicide inspector, is in the middle of an exhumation when his phone rings. San Francisco's mayor is being blackmailed and has ordered Cain back to the city...a helicopter is on its way. The casket, and Cain's cold-case investigation, must wait. At City Hall, the mayor shows Cain four photographs he's received: the first, an unforgettable blonde; the second, pills and handcuffs on a nightstand; the third, the woman drinking from a flask; and last, the woman naked, unconscious, and shackled to a bed. The accompanying letter is straightforward: worse revelations are on the way unless the mayor takes his own life first. An intricately plotted, deeply affecting thriller that keeps readers guessing until the final pages, The Dark Room tracks Cain as he hunts for the blackmailer, pitching him into the web of destruction and devotion the mayor casts in his shadow"--… (more)

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