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World of Pooh by A. A. Milne
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World of Pooh (edition 1957)

by A. A. Milne

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3,610381,459 (4.49)104
Member:empress8411
Title:World of Pooh
Authors:A. A. Milne
Info:Dutton Juvenile (1957), Edition: 1st Illustrated Edition, Paperback, 314 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:Childrens - Classic

Work details

The World of Winnie-the-Pooh: The Complete Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner by A. A. Milne (Author)

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» See also 104 mentions

English (35)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
Most of the time, I am not a big fan of stream of consciousness writing, but Milne's limited use works well in this book. I love doing the voices with Rebekah. It was also interesting to see how the animated version of Winnie-the-Pooh and the Blustery Day combined/altered several stories in this collection.

The other interesting thing about this book is that Eyeore is not just sad, he is rather self absorbed and a little arrogant, in his own sad, gloomy sort of way. This probably didn't hold Rebekah's attention like some of the more recent books we've read, but overall, it was enjoyable. ( )
  memlhd | Jan 23, 2016 |
Most of the time, I am not a big fan of stream of consciousness writing, but Milne's limited use works well in this book. I love doing the voices with Rebekah. It was also interesting to see how the animated version of Winnie-the-Pooh and the Blustery Day combined/altered several stories in this collection.

The other interesting thing about this book is that Eyeore is not just sad, he is rather self absorbed and a little arrogant, in his own sad, gloomy sort of way. This probably didn't hold Rebekah's attention like some of the more recent books we've read, but overall, it was enjoyable. ( )
  memlhd | Jan 23, 2016 |
This is a 2 part children's book in which chapters somewhat build on each other, but each can be taken as a separate story. The stories are short enough that we always read the whole thing in full (but too long for our bedtime stories). There are many themes such as discovery, friendship, problem solving, appreciating or being open to being nice to others, and growing up that are explored to various degrees.

The characters and adventures are appropriate for young readers. I read the entire book to my four-year-old over a few months (we read a story or two at a time but then may not read it again for a few days). While my child enjoyed the book, he didn't always understand what was going on. I think we'll enjoy this more in a year or two. The characters include both stuffed animals and make-believe animals. I thought this was a really interesting concept, particularly that the animals knew this. There are points in the book that are really only understandable for the adult reading. They were stories that both I as a parent, and my child could enjoy.

I liked that there is nothing truly scary; Piglet's fear is the main driver of any "scary" and it is always resolved by the end of the story.
I cried at the end of the last story.

Note that these stories were created for a particular child and that they were his stuffed animals. Therefore, there is only one female character (Kanga, a mother figure), because the child probably only made one of his animals female (I know my son rejects my suggesting that any of the stuffed animals are female). However, all of the animals have unique personalities and show a full range of emotions (between them). So, for those that lament the lack of female characters, remember that there's more diversity within a sex than between which is important for a child to learn too; but if it really annoys you just change the sex of the characters. Too bad English attributes sex because I think the animals could have been without sex/gender but that makes for poor writing. ( )
  kparr | Dec 31, 2015 |
I love Winnie-The-Pooh. It's great for Children of all ages. ( )
  RBeene | Mar 17, 2015 |
The Winnie the pooh tales tell the story of Pooh and his friends. This classic could be used to illustrate the importance of friendship. It's a good story to read aloud.
  harleybrenton | Mar 12, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (42 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Milne, A. A.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shepard, Ernest H.Illustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shepard, E.H.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Contains

Inspired

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Awards and honors
Epigraph
TO HER

Hand in hand we come
Christopher Robin and I
To lay this book in your lap.
Say you're surprised?
Say you like it?
Say it's just what you wanted?
Because it's yours -
Because we love you.
Dedication
First words
Introduction:  If you happen to have read another book about Christopher Robin, you may remember that he once had a swan (or the swan had Christopher Robin, I don't know which) and that he used to call this swan Pooh.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work includes both "Winnie-the-Pooh" and "The House at Pooh Corner". Please don't combine with either work.
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
"The World of Pooh" includes "Winnie-the-Pooh" and "The House at Pooh Corner".
"The World of Christopher Robin" includes "When We Were Very Young" and "Now We Are Six".
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0525457232, Hardcover)

When Christopher Robin asks Pooh what he likes doing best in the world, Pooh says, after much thought, "What I like best in the whole world is Me and Piglet going to see You, and You saying 'What about a little something?' and Me saying, 'Well, I shouldn't mind a little something, should you, Piglet,' and it being a hummy sort of day outside, and birds singing."

Happy readers for over 70 years couldn't agree more. Pooh's status as a "Bear of Very Little Brain" belies his profoundly eternal wisdom in the ways of the world. To many, Winnie-the-Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, and the others are as familiar and important as their own family members. A.A. Milne's classics, Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner, are brought together in this beautiful edition, complete and unabridged, with recolored illustrations by Milne's creative counterpart, Ernest H. Shepard. Join Pooh and the gang as they meet a Heffalump, help get Pooh unstuck from Rabbit's doorway, (re)build a house for Eeyore, and try to unbounce Tigger. A childhood is simply not complete without full participation in all of Pooh's adventures. (All ages) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:11 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

This deluxe volume brings all of the Pooh stories together in one full-color, large-format book with complete and unabridged text and illustrations.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 11 descriptions

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