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Borne by Jeff VanderMeer
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Borne

by Jeff VanderMeer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Borne (1)

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7113619,086 (3.89)49
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English (35)  German (1)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
Like Annihilation before it, Borne is a slow book, a rich book. It's intense, it demands that you take your time with it, because every word has been painstakingly chosen and put together to create not only meaning, but feeling that runs deep, and an intuitive understanding that runs even deeper. Every instant that you spend reading it is worth it and more.

Jeff Vandermeer is very, very good at writing weird fiction that incorporates the disquieting and biological without actually crossing over into horror. In Borne he tells a beautifully human story with a cast of majority non-human characters. There are themes of parenthood, personhood, and love that somehow sit comfortably alongside and are even enhanced by out of control bio-engineering, giant flying bears, and alcohol minnows.

I really don't know what else to say, except that you should read this book. It's a masterpiece of tragedy and hope, disquiet and beauty. Jeff Vandermeer has done it again.

This review first appeared on my blog. ( )
  VLarkinAnderson | Sep 24, 2018 |
Weird and fabulous. Jeff VanderMeer creates worlds unlike any other and fabulous and haunting creatures to inhabit them. Borne stars a "blob" that Rachel finds while scavenging on the hide of the colossal bear-creature that rules their world. What does it mean to be alive? What does it mean to be a person? What does it mean to be good? So many themes and ideas. If you enjoyed the Southern Reach trilogy, you will definitely like this! ( )
  ouroborosangel | Sep 7, 2018 |
Vandermeer further refines his unique brand of psycho-philisophical literary fantastic with Borne, presenting themes of love, parenting, biology, identity, evolution, and power in poetic language that turns an eco-pocalyptic scifi setting into the stuff of dreams (and nightmares). For fans of Kafka, Atwood's Madaddam trilogy (Oryx & Crake, Year of the Flood), Ursula Le Guin, and China Mieville. Imagine Watership Down cross-bred with a David Cronenberg movie! ( )
  Chamblyman | May 20, 2018 |
Vandermeer further refines his unique brand of psycho-philisophical literary fantastic with Borne, presenting themes of love, parenting, biology, identity, evolution, and power in poetic language that turns an eco-pocalyptic scifi setting into the stuff of dreams (and nightmares). For fans of Kafka, Atwood's Madaddam trilogy (Oryx & Crake, Year of the Flood), Ursula Le Guin, and China Mieville. Imagine Watership Down cross-bred with a David Cronenberg movie! ( )
  Chamblyman | May 20, 2018 |
Couldn't finish this one: after reading a summary of the complete plot, maybe I should have kept going a bit, but just could not get interested in the story and characters ( )
  Guide2 | Apr 30, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jeff VanderMeerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Žeželj, DanijelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellner, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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I found Borne on a sunny gunmetal day when the giant bear Mord came roving near our home.
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"Am I a person or a weapon?"
He was born, but I had borne him.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374115249, Hardcover)

“Am I a person or a weapon?” Borne asks Rachel, in extremis.
“Yes, you are a person,” Rachel tells him. “But like a person, you can be a weapon, too.”

In Borne, the epic new novel from Jeff VanderMeer, author of the acclaimed, bestselling Southern Reach Trilogy, a young woman named Rachel survives as a scavenger in a ruined, dangerous city of the near future. The city is littered with discarded experiments from the Company―a biotech firm now seemingly derelict―and punished by the unpredictable attacks of a giant bear. From one of her scavenging missions, Rachel brings home Borne, who is little more than a green lump―plant or animal?―but exudes a strange charisma. Rachel feels a growing attachment to Borne, a protectiveness that she can ill afford. It’s exactly the kind of vulnerability that will upend her precarious existence, unnerving her partner, Wick, and upsetting the delicate balance of their unforgiving city―possibly forever. And yet, little as she understands what or who Borne may be, she cannot give him up, even as Borne grows and changes . . . “He was born, but I had borne him.

(retrieved from Amazon Wed, 14 Dec 2016 11:58:21 -0500)

"'Am I a person?' Borne asks Rachel, in extremis. 'Yes, you are a person, ' Rachel tells him. 'But like a person, you can be a weapon, too.' In a ruined, nameless city of the future, Rachel makes her living as a scavenger. She finds a creature she names Borne entangled in the fur of Mord, a gigantic despotic bear that once prowled the corridors of a biotech firm, the Company, until he was experimented on, grew large, learned to fly, and broke free. Made insane by the company's torture of him, Mord terrorizes the city even as he provides sustenance for scavengers. At first, Borne looks like nothing at all--just a green lump that might be a discard from the Company, which, although severely damaged, is rumored to still make creatures and send them to far-distant places that have not yet suffered collapse. Borne reminds Rachel of the island nation of her birth, now long lost to rising seas. She feels an attachment that she resents: attachments are traps, and in this world any weakness can kill you. Yet when she takes Borne to her subterranean sanctuary, Rachel convinces her lover, Wick--a special kind of dealer--not to render down Borne as raw genetic material for the drugs he sells. But nothing is quite the way it seems: not the past, not the present, not the future. If Wick is hiding secrets, so is Rachel--and Borne most of all. What Rachel finds hidden deep within the Company will change everything and everyone. There, lost and forgotten things have lingered and grown. What they have grown into is mighty indeed"-- "From the author of the Southern Reach Trilogy comes a story about two humans, and two creatures. The humans are Rachel and Wick -- a scavenger and a drug dealer -- both with too many secrets and fears, ready with traps to be set and sprung. The creatures are Mord and Borne -- animal, perhaps plant, maybe company discard, biotech, cruel experiment, dinner, deity, or source of spare parts"--… (more)

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