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The Child by Fiona Barton
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The Child (edition 2017)

by Fiona Barton (Author)

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4374534,077 (3.83)23
Member:Whisper1
Title:The Child
Authors:Fiona Barton (Author)
Info:Berkley (2017), 384 pages
Collections:Your library, To read
Rating:
Tags:TBR, ADDED 10/06/17

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The Child by Fiona Barton

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Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
The main characters of The Child are all intriguing. There is Kate the reporter following up on a story of a baby’s remains found buried during a construction dig. Angela is the mother of a baby that was kidnapped from the hospital just hours after her birth and has never had closure. Emma is a surprise POV; she lived at the location that the baby remains were found. I found it interesting how different their lives were yet together the stories all came together perfectly.

There were secrets, intrigue, and surprises that I never saw coming. The mystery was not hard to solve but with each different twist and turn I learned more about the various characters. I was invested in Kate getting her story, Angela getting her closure, and Emma coming to terms with her teenage years. There is so much more to this story than meets the eyes.

The ending was the surprise. The Child is certainly a psychological thriller that kept me on my toes. I could not put the book down. ( )
  Charlotte_Lynn | Jul 26, 2018 |
I recently read her previous book "The Widow" and I really enjoyed, (even with some of the darker themes) I knew I had to read "The Child." This one did not capture my attention as quickly as the other. I was about 100 pages in before the story grabbed me, but once it did, it became some what fast-paced. This was definitely character driven with short chapters (which I love) from four main POV's and a cast of great secondary characters. Overall this was a very good read and I definitely recommend. ( )
  TraceyTurnsThePage2 | Jul 23, 2018 |
I didn't realize characters from Barton's The Widow were part of this book until a third of the way through. It's not necessary to read the earlier book to understand this book, but it was nice to have some history and a different perspective on the earlier book, as well.
I had the mystery figured out about half way through The Child, but kept reading anyway to see how everything turned out. So, not a tense thriller in the least, but interesting enough to keep me reading. ( )
  ouroborosangel | May 22, 2018 |
This book held my interest from Word One to the last punctuation. The premise is, there is a decades-old skeleton of a baby found in a neighborhood that is under construction. The secrets that swaddle the long-lost baby unfurl from there, with unimaginable twists throughout. I absolutely give this five stars and have already started on my next Fiona Barton masterpiece. Highly recommended! ( )
  TLVZ721 | May 2, 2018 |
4.5 stars

I don't know what to say about this book. Like Fiona's previous book, this book had my mind in overdrive. Barton has a way of giving things in pieces that keep you hunting for more as you turn the page.

This story is told by four different people, all connected in one way or another; not all ways are apparent at first. You get piece by piece who the baby could possibly be. I was turning the pages furiously trying to figure out the puzzle like it was urgent I get to the end. Fiona is such a pro at having her readers jumping at the bit to know what happens at the end.

So, there was a point in the book where all of the pieces finally fit, and I had it all worked out. However, how the book played out from there was very vital. Even though I had connected the dots, that did not lessen the impact the ending had! The events that followed had my eyes watering and me smiling like a Cheshire cat!

Thriller fans... You MUST read this book. All other book lovers, READ this book. ( )
  AmberGoleb | Mar 13, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
FIONA BARTON’S debut novel The Widow was a bestseller last year and her second psychological thriller deserves to follow suit...It is gruesomely compelling, mawkish and macabre with abundant twists and turns to keep the interest levels high...The Child is not only a fast-paced missing baby yarn it also casts light on how people can manipulate and lie until someone such as Waters exposes their true natures.
 
Enjoyable as those scenes are, however, the rest of “The Child” should have been sent to the publishing equivalent of Kate’s rewrite desk....“The Child” is a middling and much-too-long suspense story that would have benefited from a ruthless red-pencil. As she did in “The Widow,” Barton relies on multiple points of view to tell (and retell) the larger story of the “Building Site Baby” as the unidentified infant comes to be known....“The Child” isn’t a terrible novel; it’s simply much too much of a just okay one.
 
Some books tell you a great deal, while other books show even more. I'm happy to report that Fiona Barton's second novel, The Child, falls firmly into the second camp....The Child is told from several perspectives — in this case, Kate's, a grieving mother named Angela, and a younger wife named Emma who is afflicted with terrible anxiety. Kate is looking for a story. Angela is looking for closure. Emma isn't sure what she's looking for, but she knows the answer lies in her past as the daughter of a single mother named Jude.. You're in medias res with Kate, Angela, and Emma, and the spliced action-narration is an excellent way of reminding you that no crime affects just one person, and each person it affects has many other people in her life. The frequent, fast chapters (86 of them!) highlight all of those people and their daily routines.
 
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Epigraph
When truth is replaced by silence, the silence is a lie. Yevgeny Yevtushenko
Dedication
For M & D
First words
My computer is winking at me knowingly when I sit down at my desk.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
amazon ca product description : As an old house is demolished in a gentrifying section of London, a workman discovers a tiny skeleton, buried for years. For journalist Kate Waters, it’s a story that deserves attention. She cobbles together a piece for her newspaper, but at a loss for answers, she can only pose a question: Who is the Building Site Baby?

As Kate investigates, she unearths connections to a crime that rocked the city decades earlier: A newborn baby was stolen from the maternity ward in a local hospital and was never found. Her heartbroken parents were left devastated by the loss.

But there is more to the story, and Kate is drawn—house by house—into the pasts of the people who once lived in this neighborhood that has given up its greatest mystery. And she soon finds herself the keeper of unexpected secrets that erupt in the lives of three women—and torn between what she can and cannot tell…
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"The author of the stunning New York Times bestseller The Widow returns with a brand-new novel of twisting psychological suspense. As an old house is demolished in a gentrifying section of London, a workman discovers a tiny skeleton, buried for years. For journalist Kate Waters, it's a story that deserves attention. She cobbles together a piece for her newspaper, but at a loss for answers, she can only pose a question: Who is the Building Site Baby? As Kate investigates, she unearths connections to a crime that rocked the city decades earlier: A newborn baby was stolen from the maternity ward in a local hospital and was never found. Her heartbroken parents were left devastated by the loss. But there is more to the story, and Kate is drawn--house by house--into the pasts of the people who once lived in this neighborhood that has given up its greatest mystery. And she soon finds herself the keeper of unexpected secrets that erupt in the lives of three women--and torn between what she can and cannot tell"--… (more)

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