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Appetites: Why Women Want by Caroline Knapp
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Appetites: Why Women Want

by Caroline Knapp

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» See also 8 mentions

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THE BEST BOOK EVER!!!! AMAZING, AMAZING, AMAZING! Incredibly eye-opening ( )
  turningleaves | Sep 22, 2017 |
Much food for thought, going quite a bit beyond just eating disorders to hunger and desire -- of all types -- and why women feel compelled to deny them. Appetites includes numerous interviews with women, excerpts from classic feminist texts, and sociological statistics blended together in such a way to present a work that could be categorized as a cultural study. This title would, I believe, serve as a wonderful pick for a women’s book club that enjoys a more cerebral selection. For those with young daughters I believe it is particularly compelling as you are forced to realize the various gender characteristics you may unintentionally promote, even while, at the same time, each day you hate having to live under them and suffer their ill effects (‘promotion’ by virtue of the example we set as we accept them in our own lives). A reviewer on Amazon (“LCC”) adeptly summed up the general thrust of the book: “[it] focuses on the psychology of women and how society impacts women’s desires and sense of entitlement.” Appetites looks at what it means to feed, truly, the body and soul… and why so many women instead believe they deserve to starve. ( )
  SaraMSLIS | Mar 1, 2016 |
I would have liked this book a lot better had it been a full-on memoir, but then again, I have already read Drinking: A Love Story. It was just kind of like a rehash of The Beauty Myth and a lot of anecdotes about how women are socialized to hate ourselves. Maybe I would have been more open to it if I hadn't already read a ton of feminist books on the same topic. ( )
  lemontwist | May 21, 2014 |
I loved the line that said that fashion magazines say "Fuck me" to men and "Fuck you" to women. ( )
  aBohemian1 | Jul 11, 2012 |
One of the most thoughtful and beautifully written memoirs concerning anorexia I have read. Columnist Knapp examines her own journey through anorexia and recovery, and also ruminates on the many ways women thwart their own desires. I would recommend this to just about anyone. ( )
  ediedoll | Oct 5, 2010 |
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Knapp, best-selling author of Drinking: A Love Story and Pack of Two, has turned her brilliant eye towards how a woman's appetite -for food, for love, for work, and for pleasure- is shaped and constrained by culture.

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