HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Remnant Population by Elizabeth Moon
Loading...

Remnant Population (original 1996; edition 1996)

by Elizabeth Moon

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7352412,706 (3.92)73
Member:SuseGordon
Title:Remnant Population
Authors:Elizabeth Moon
Info:Baen (1996), Hardcover, 339 pages
Collections:Basement Collection, To read
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Remnant Population by Elizabeth Moon (1996)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 73 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
Loved this affirmative story of an elder woman finally taking control of her life, being creative, enjoying nature, overcoming the inner voice that used to always tell her she was no good & has no power. Her sensitivity to body language enables her to develop ties with an indigenous intelligent species and confront bureaucrats who take a paternalistic attitude to that species.
I had previously read Haushofer's "The Wall" (cited by Moon as a literary antecedent). I can hear Moon thinking "I wouldn't be such a sad, rigid stick if I were left alone in the world" and going on to prove it. I'm glad she did.
Some good quotes: "Always something to overcome the body's momentary collapse, if you only gave it a chance. A color, a scent, a scrap of music." (p. 194) "What they [teachers] cared about, all they really cared about, was that she learned to do what she was told and not make messes...had not cared whether she understood the machines she was taught to tend and repair. Follow the instructions...It's no harder than making a dress from a pattern, one of them told her. Even homemakers like you can do that. She had clenched herself around the pain of his scorn and proved that she could..." (p.160) "The joy of creation, of play, had been the empty place unfilled by family and social duties. She would have loved her children better, she thought now, if she had realized how much she herself needed to play, to follow her own childish desire to handle beautiful things and make more beauty." (p 100) "It was the old guilt, which insisted that she be responsible for everything, that things must be conserved in case of later need." (p.101) ( )
  juniperSun | Jul 23, 2014 |
The story of a pleasant old woman who avoids leaving when her colony is evacuated from a recently settled planet; a replacement colony is slaughtered by locals, but she gets on friendly terms with the local begs and shares language with them. A hardline group of investigators tries to deny the aliens are intelligent language-users, using Chomskyite "Clever Hans" arguments etc. Ultimately the aliens defeat the hardliners and she ends up living (and finally dying) peacefully surrounded by reconciled humans and aliens. There are only two or three books I can think of that make equally intelligent use of language/intelligence theories for science fiction. Her aliens are not cute little fuzzies. They drink animal blood and kill people quite efficiently, but still they are sympathetic beings with their own point of view. ( )
  antiquary | Jun 21, 2014 |
This is a book I re-read from time to time.

I love the way Ofelia is portrayed: such a sympathetic portrait of an old woman who is sick of fitting in with everyone else and just wants to be left alone.

It's a beautifully crafted book and has a satisfying ending. ( )
  fairyhedgehog | Dec 14, 2013 |
Tiptree longlist 1996 ( )
  SChant | Nov 8, 2013 |
I plan to be a tough, eccentric old lady someday (beats the alternative.) If you aren't into that then I'm not sure why you are even reading this review, but presumably it was helpful. I would class this as a comfort food book, like high quality mashed potatoes. ( )
  sprite | Aug 7, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Elizabeth Moonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ruddell, GaryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Betsy, who provided the spark,
And Mary, Ellen, and Carrie
who responded with warmth and light.
First words
Between her toes the damp earth felt cool, but already sweat crept between the roots of her hair.
Quotations
Always something to overcome the body's momentary collapse, if you only gave it a chance. A color, a scent, a scrap of music. (p. 194)
What they [instructors] cared about, all they really cared about, was that she learned to do what she was told and not make messes...had not cared whether she understood the machines she was taught to tend and repair. Follow the instructions...It's no harder than making a dress from a pattern, one of them told her. Even homemakers like you can do that. She had clenched herself around the pain of his scorn and proved that she could... (p.160)
The joy of creation, of play, had been the empty place unfilled by family and social duties. She would have loved her children better, she thought now, if she had realized how much she herself needed to play, to follow her own childish desire to handle beautiful things and make more beauty. (p 100)
It was the old guilt, which insisted that she be responsible for everything, that things must be conserved in case of later need. (p.101)
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Alone at Last

People had always told Oelia what to do'; for once she was going to do what she wanted. She refused to get on the cryo ships, refused to leave the only world she could call home. and when they finally came for her, she hid - not that the authorities looked all that hard for one crazy old woman. Now Ofelia is alone, content to live with no more demands on her self or her time, the only remaining settler on an abandoned planet.

Then new settlers arrive.At first she fears they have come to reoccupy the settlement she has come to think of as hers - but they land far away. And as Ofelia secretly listens, the are slaughtered to the last child by stone-age aliens no one knew were there.

Now it is up to OFelia to save the aliens form Earth's wrath...
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 034546219X, Paperback)

In a far-flung capitalistic empire among the stars, generations of colonization without a single contact with an intelligent, non-human species have reduced the colonial process to a franchise system. Amid the abuses of the system which inevitably follow, an old woman decides not to leave when her failed colony is evacuated, thinking the freedom to live alone and die in peace is worth any risk. In this entertaining but suspenseful first-contact novel, Elizabeth Moon's apt depiction of the interaction between old and young plays counterpoint to the interaction between human and alien.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:28 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

When her company relocates to another planet, Ofelia Falfurrias, 70, who expects to be downsized anyway, decides to remain behind. Thus she discovers the planet's population as it emerges from hiding, now that the humans have left. A meeting of cultures.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
10 avail.
21 wanted
2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.92)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 7
2.5 2
3 38
3.5 4
4 49
4.5 11
5 45

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,333,672 books! | Top bar: Always visible