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Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in…
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Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions (2017)

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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5373528,134 (4.31)46

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» See also 46 mentions

English (33)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
ALL THE STARS. This is a small book, but so heartfelt and precise and cutting and beautiful. I want to read and re-read this so much the book falls apart, then buy another copy and do it all over again. ( )
  liannecollins | Apr 18, 2019 |
Hermoso, simple, honesto. ( )
  tcanaleso | Apr 14, 2019 |
There is much here that rings true with a Christian perspective. For instance:

1) Not viewing marriage as an achievement.
2) Not teaching girls they should be likable, but rather teaching them to be kind.

Worth reading. ( )
  melissa_faith | Mar 16, 2019 |
This book should be mandatory reading for any parent raising daughters. And every male, parent or not, should read it as well. It's one of the clearest and constructive statements of what it means to be feminist and the advice the author gives to parents -- and all of us -- is profound. It's short, to the point, but a delight to read. And put into practice or as a shared perspective in society it has the potential to make the world a safe and nurturing place for our daughters as the grow into adults. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. ( )
  spbooks | Mar 13, 2019 |
Everything she writes gets better and better. She's amazing and this is a great read for EVERYONE, not just mothers looking to raise their daughters as feminists. ( )
  Katie_Roscher | Jan 18, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichieprimary authorall editionscalculated
LaVoy, JanuaryNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wong, JoanCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Uju Egonu./ And for my baby sis, Ogechukwu Ikemelu./ With so much love.
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Book description
A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. 'Dear Ijeawele' is Adichie's letter of response. Here are fifteen suggestions for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can "allow" women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It can start a conversation about what it really means to be a woman today
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 152473313X, Hardcover)


From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today--written as a letter to a friend.


A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie's letter of response.
     Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions--compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive--for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can "allow" women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

(retrieved from Amazon Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:17:52 -0500)

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"From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today--written as a letter to a friend."--Back cover.

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