HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Mad Country by Samrat Upadhyay
Loading...

Mad Country

by Samrat Upadhyay

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
152902,036 (4)5

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
I wasn't entirely sure what I thought about the stories in this book as I worked my way through it. So many of them seemed to be about people who are, for want of a better way to describe them, lost souls; people who lack something in their lives. On the surface they seem to be reasonably well adjusted, or at least to know what it is they want from their lives. But as each story progresses, they all have strange, often disturbing transformations, slipping easily into different realities.

These stories are about metamorphoses, the most jarring of which are people of privilege who slip into lives of less privilege and (seemingly) greater simplicity. Sofi, an American girl, loses herself in the Nepali culture, insisting on becoming Nepali, and forgetting about her old life in Ohio. But underneath the new surface and new name is the old Sofi, who is betrayed by her own needs. Anamika, is a successful business woman with a truant son and disabled husband. Her adept manipulation of others fails her, and she is arrested and held in prison where she undergoes a profound change, a rejection of all she'd held dear, and we see her essential character as being quite different from what we had first thought.

These are stories which require a good deal of thought. They don't easily give up their meaning, and even seem to lead nowhere in some cases. But when taken as a whole, as pieces of a larger narrative, they describe our desire to escape life's difficulties, and the way in which our own personalities will always color those escapes.

Well worth your time. ( )
  Tracy_Rowan | Jul 3, 2017 |
I wasn't entirely sure what I thought about the stories in this book as I worked my way through it. So many of them seemed to be about people who are, for want of a better way to describe them, lost souls; people who lack something in their lives. On the surface they seem to be reasonably well adjusted, or at least to know what it is they want from their lives. But as each story progresses, they all have strange, often disturbing transformations, slipping easily into different realities.

These stories are about metamorphoses, the most jarring of which are people of privilege who slip into lives of less privilege and (seemingly) greater simplicity. Sofi, an American girl, loses herself in the Nepali culture, insisting on becoming Nepali, and forgetting about her old life in Ohio. But underneath the new surface and new name is the old Sofi, who is betrayed by her own needs. Anamika, is a successful business woman with a truant son and disabled husband. Her adept manipulation of others fails her, and she is arrested and held in prison where she undergoes a profound change, a rejection of all she'd held dear, and we see her essential character as being quite different from what we had first thought.

These are stories which require a good deal of thought. They don't easily give up their meaning, and even seem to lead nowhere in some cases. But when taken as a whole, as pieces of a larger narrative, they describe our desire to escape life's difficulties, and the way in which our own personalities will always color those escapes.

Well worth your time. ( )
  TracyRowanAuthor | May 12, 2017 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"Samrat Upadhyay's new collection vibrates at the edges of intersecting cultures. Journalists in Kathmandu are targeted by the government. A Nepali man studying in America drops out of school and finds himself a part of the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. A white American woman moves to Nepal and changes her name. A Nepali man falls in love with mysterious foreign black woman. A rich kid is caught up in his own fantasies of poverty and bank robbery. In the title story, a powerful woman, the owner of a construction company becomes a political prisoner, and in stark and unflinching prose, we see both her world and her mind radically remade. Through the course of the stories in this collection, Upadhyay builds new modes of seeing our interconnected contemporary world. A collection of formal inventiveness, heartbreak and hope, it reaffirms Upadhyay's position as one or our most important chroniclers of globalization and exile"--… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 3
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,980,769 books! | Top bar: Always visible