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Testimony by Scott Turow
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Testimony

by Scott Turow

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Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
Multi-layered, well written story of war crimes, gypsies and the aftermath of civil war in the Balkans. ( )
  cfk | Jul 7, 2018 |
This is the second entry in author Turow's Kindle County series I've read and I certainly plan to read more of them. In this one, former US Attorney Willem ten Boom leaves Kindle County to work for the International Criminal Court located in The Hague on a case that takes him into war-ravaged Bosnia. I don't know enough about the events of the US and NATO interventions there to tell where fact morphed into fiction but this is so well written I had no problem following the plot and keeping track of the large cast of characters. As a legal thriller, it's good but the main character's reflections on love, war, displacement, zealotry, charismatic despots - the list goes on - are what made this an extraordinary read for me. I liked the nod to The Hiding Place: The Triumphant True Story of Corrie Ten Boom and wonder if I missed any others.
I received this book for free through Goodreads Giveaways. ( )
  wandaly | Jun 9, 2018 |
I found many parts of this book to be very confusing what with all of the factions involved from various countries, and it could have benefited by the cutting of perhaps 150 pages. It might also be nice to read a story once in a while where the hero could keep it in his pants for more than a month or two. Still, I've enjoyed Scott Turow's books in the past, and this one was OK, but certainly not one of his best. ( )
  flourgirl49 | Dec 17, 2017 |
I have never read a book by Scott Turow before, but I like legal thrillers and I found the blurb of this book intriguing. The case of the missing 400 people is interesting, although I did find the story a bit slow now and then. The best part came towards the end of the book when the case started to take some interesting twist and turns because nothing is as it seems and the ending was surprising. It was also interesting to learn more about The International Criminal Court and the Bosnian war.

However, there were one thing that really bothered me in this book and that was Esma Czarni. I was not that thrilled about Boom's relationship with her, but that was not really what bothered me the most, it was that for some reason no one thought about doing a thorough investigation about her. I was actually a bit baffled when Boom started to make inquiries. At least Boom wised up and saw her for what she really is in the end.

Testimony is an interesting book, I did find the story dragged a bit now and then and to be honest Boom really didn't make a big impression on me. But, the case was interesting and I, for the most part, enjoyed reading the book and I wouldn't mind reading more books by Scott Turow.

I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy for an honest review! ( )
  MaraBlaise | Dec 14, 2017 |
Testimony, Scott Turow, author; Wayne Pyle, narrator
I usually enjoy Turow’s books, but this one went off on too many tangents, and contained too much foolish dialogue between characters that did nothing to enhance the novel. It had far too many romantic, sexual interludes which were distracting and caused the plot to have a lack of continuity. It was often confusing, requiring rereading. It took almost ¾ of the book before it actually held my interest, and were it not for the fact that I have liked the author’s writing style in the past, I would not have finished it. Because it was based on incidents that did not, but might have taken place during the very real Serbian/Croatian war, if the author had stayed on message, the book would have been far more interesting and way shorter. In the end, the novel left me with the feeling that nothing would be resolved, although the true facts would be revealed. It was as if the author prepared me for the coming of Book Two!
In brief, the book is about attorney, Bill ten Boom. He is going through a mid-life crisis in his mid fifties. His marriage is over, his children are pretty well grown, and he needs a change. When the opportunity comes to pick up stakes and begin anew, he takes it and heads to The Hague to investigate a possible war crime. It is a crime of great magnitude, concerning the massacre of an entire Roma village. The genocide seems to have been covered up, and is only now being investigated.
The characters are colorful, straying from the mainstream. Some are deceitful and manipulative, some innocent, some savvy and sexy. Some are even sincere. However, all appear to be flawed in some way. Even America does not come away pure as the driven snow in this novel. Some characters are intended by name or action to remind the reader of the real Bosnian conflict and to make some characters resemble real life villains and war criminals like a supposed Serb leader named Laza Kajevic who is easily substituted for the real life Radovan Karadzic. In one of the flights of fancy that the author takes the reader, Boom, whose heritage is Dutch, discovers surprising secrets about his parents’ past during World War II, as he investigates the case. Well researched, the book can be entertaining, and all in all, if the reader sticks to the book, it will be a fairly interesting read.
Testimony, Scott Turow, author; Wayne Pyle, narrator
I usually enjoy Turow’s books, but this one went off on too many tangents, and contained too much foolish dialogue between characters that did nothing to enhance the novel. It had far too many romantic, sexual interludes which were distracting and caused the plot to have a lack of continuity. It was often confusing, requiring rereading. It took almost ¾ of the book before it actually held my interest, and were it not for the fact that I have liked the author’s writing style in the past, I would not have finished it. Because it was based on incidents that did not, but might have taken place during the very real Serbian/Croatian war, if the author had stayed on message, the book would have been far more interesting and way shorter. In the end, the novel left me with the feeling that nothing would be resolved, although the true facts would be revealed. It was as if the author prepared me for the coming of Book Two!
In brief, the book is about attorney, Bill ten Boom. He is going through a mid-life crisis in his mid fifties. His marriage is over, his children are pretty well grown, and he needs a change. When the opportunity comes to pick up stakes and begin anew, he takes it and heads to The Hague to investigate a possible war crime. It is a crime of great magnitude, concerning the massacre of an entire Roma village. The genocide seems to have been covered up, and is only now being investigated.
The characters are colorful, straying from the mainstream. Some are deceitful and manipulative, some innocent, some savvy and sexy. Some are even sincere. However, all appear to be flawed in some way. Even America does not come away pure as the driven snow in this novel. Some characters are intended by name or action to remind the reader of the real Bosnian conflict and to make some characters resemble real life villains and war criminals like a supposed Serb leader named Laza Kajevic who is easily substituted for the real life Radovan Karadzic. In one of the flights of fancy that the author takes the reader, Boom, whose heritage is Dutch, discovers surprising secrets about his parents’ past during World War II, as he investigates the case. Well researched, the book can be entertaining, and all in all, if the reader sticks to the book, it will be a fairly interesting read. ( )
  thewanderingjew | Oct 3, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Adriane
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Prologue: “There were men,” said the witness.
Chapter One: At the age of fifty, I had decided to start my life again.
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"In the bestselling tradition of Presumed Innocent--the 1987 debut novel that made him "one of the major writers in America" (NPR)--comes what may be Scott Turow's best thriller yet ... Bill ten Boom has walked out on everything he thought was important to him: his career, his wife, Kindle County, even his country. Still, when he is tapped to examine the disappearance of an entire Gypsy refugee camp--unsolved for ten years--he feels drawn to what will become the most elusive case of his career. In order to uncover what happened during the apocalyptic chaos after the Bosnian War, Boom must navigate a host of suspects ranging from Serb paramilitaries to organized crime gangs to the U.S. government, while also maneuvering among the alliances and treacheries of those connected to the case: Morgan Merriwell, a disgraced U.S. Major General; Ferko Rincic, the massacre's sole survivor; and Esma Czarni, an alluring barrister with secrets to protect. A master of the legal thriller, Scott Turow has returned with his most irresistibly confounding and satisfying novel yet"--… (more)

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