HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Young Lonigan (1932)

by James T. Farrell

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Studs Lonigan (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1643121,778 (3.45)33
The first volume of James T. Farrell's remarkable Studs Lonigan trilogy An American classic in the vein of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, the first book of James T. Farrell's powerful Studs Lonigan trilogy covers five months of the young hero's life in 1916, when he is sixteen years old. In this relentlessly naturalistic yet richly complex portrait, Studs is carried along by his swaggering and shortsighted companions, his narrow family, and his educational and religious background toward a fate that he resists yet cannot escape. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 33 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
Hasn't aged well. It wasn't clear to me if the toxic masculinity was being praised, and I'm not sure this first volume motivates me to read the rest to find out. I know the ethnic slurs are of the time but even so they seemed a bit thick. Women and girls are treated horribly. Characters aren't really developed other than Lonigan. ( )
  encephalical | Aug 24, 2019 |
$150.00
  danbrady | Apr 8, 2016 |
Young Lonigan is the first volume in the trilogy James T. Farrell wrote about Studs Lonigan. A fair number of copies of the trilogy is listed on LT, but it seems this early modern classic, first published in 1932, does not have as many readers as it deserves.

The story is fairly simple and straight forward. Told over the period of a summer holiday, it relates how young Studs Lonigan, just graduated from junior high school does not really know what to do with himself. Procrastination prevents him from getting a job, while boredom drives him to join a street gang. Aged fifteen, sixteen Studs has just started smoking, shaving, masturbating in the bathroom, looking at girls, showing off his muscles and brawny attitude, fighting in the gang. The book is written in the vernacular of that time, the style of these young working class boys:

Wilson’s a morphidite,” Studs said.
“What’s that?”
“ A guy that’s both a man and a woman at the same time, like fat Leon,” said Studs.

The action and the language get progressively ruder toward the end of the book. There is some anti-semitism throughout the book, and the Jewish kids are also organized in their own gangs. On page 177 the Irish gang, to which Studs belongs, beats up two Jewish boys in an alley, calling them “Christ killers” and various other offensive words are used throughout the book.

While there’s a lot of talk about girls, there’s also action. One day, the boys of the gang “visit” Iris at home, when her Mom isn’t home, and we are told that most of the guys were having a gang-shag at Iris. (p. 191). And that action leads to some useful life lessons, as illustrated by this dialogue:

”How’s it going today, Paulie?” asked Studs.
“Oh, the athlete is still running,” Paulie said.
“Still running?” said Studs.
“Yeh, he’s a good track man,” said Paulie.
“If I was you, I’d get the jane that did it to you, and paste the living hell out of her,” said Weary.
(p.200) ( )
1 vote edwinbcn | Feb 2, 2012 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James T. Farrellprimary authorall editionscalculated
Avati, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the Memory of GRANDMOTHER JULIA BROWN DALY
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The first volume of James T. Farrell's remarkable Studs Lonigan trilogy An American classic in the vein of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, the first book of James T. Farrell's powerful Studs Lonigan trilogy covers five months of the young hero's life in 1916, when he is sixteen years old. In this relentlessly naturalistic yet richly complex portrait, Studs is carried along by his swaggering and shortsighted companions, his narrow family, and his educational and religious background toward a fate that he resists yet cannot escape. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.45)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 6
3.5 2
4 6
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,587,322 books! | Top bar: Always visible