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Chapman's Homer: The Iliad and The Odyssey…
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Chapman's Homer: The Iliad and The Odyssey

by Homer, George Chapman

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For me it can only be George Chapman's translations of Homer. ( )
  KateSherrod | Aug 1, 2016 |
"When young any composition pleases which unites a little sense, some imagination, and some rhythm, in doses however small. But as we advance in life these things fall off one by one, and I suspect we are left at last with only Homer and Virgil, perhaps Homer alone." - Thomas Jefferson, Thoughts on English Prosody
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 30, 2014 |
Chapman's translation of Homer is my favorite, for its language and invention. The Chatto & Windus 1875 is the oldest edition I have, but unfortunately cramped in two-column format, with many lines awkwardly broken. ( )
  jamtin | Oct 14, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Homerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Chapman, Georgemain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Then forth he came, his both knees falt'ring, both
/ His strong hands hanging down, and all with froth
/ His cheeks and nostrils flowing, voice and breath
/ Spent to all use, and down he sank to death. /
The sea had soak'd his heart through; all his veins
/ His toils had rack'd t'a labouring woman's pains, /
Dead-weary was he.
Then forth he came, his both knees falt'ring, both / His strong hands hanging down, and all with froth / His cheeks and nostrils flowing, voice and breath / Spent to all use, and down he sank to death. / The sea had soak'd his heart through; all his veins / His toils had rack'd t'a labouring woman's pains, / Dead-weary was he.
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Hector bidding farewell to his wife and baby son, Odysseus bound to the mast listening to the Sirens, Penelope at the loom, Achilles dragging Hector's body round the walls of Troy - scenes from Homer have been re-portrayed in every generation. The questions about mortality and identity that Homer's heroes ask, the bonds of love, respect and fellowship that motivate them, have gripped audiences for three millennia. Chapman's 'Iliad' and 'Odyssey' are great English epic poems, but they are also two of the liveliest and readable translations of Homer. Chapman's freshness makes the everyday world of nature and the craftsman as vivid as the battlefield and Mount Olympus. His poetry is driven by the excitement of the Renaissance discovery of classical civilisation as at once vital and distant, and is enriched by the perspectives of humanist thought. AUTHOR: The two earliest surviving poetic works of ancient Greece, the 'Iliad' and the 'Odyssey' are attributed to 'Homer', but it seems likely that no such individual existed, the works being developed over an extended period of time until they achieved their final form in the 6th century BC. Whatever their origins, these epic poems were a major influence in the development of Greek culture.… (more)

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