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The Mercy Seat by Rilla Askew
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The Mercy Seat (1997)

by Rilla Askew

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1171103,116 (3.27)5

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» See also 5 mentions

detroit free press---best books of the year one of the worst, most boring books i have ever read.
nominee--pen/faulkner award the last 200 pages were *** the first 300 were dreadful
winner--western heritage award best novel such boring, unlikable characters ( )
  mahallett | Jul 4, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0140265155, Paperback)

The Mercy Seat is a powerful novel, rich with biblical allusions and authoritative, haunting depictions of the landscape and life of the American West in the second half of the 19th century. The story begins as a young girl, Mattie, is called from sleep to help her father prepare for her family's flight from their Kentucky home, its pie safe and its oak bed frames. Reasons for their sudden departure are only slowly revealed and never completely explained.

The center of the evolving story is the conflict between Mattie's father and his brother. John Lodi is skilled in the art of blacksmithing and gun making; Fayette Lodi is anxious to use that skill to turn a profit for himself. Although the brothers travel west together and eventually settle in the same corner of Oklahoma in the valley of the San Bois Mountains, they have no shared ideas on how to create new lives for themselves or their families. Violence eventually erupts, but it goes beyond the two brothers to infect their wives, their children, and the very land they inhabit.

It is a story that mirrors that of Cain and Abel, yet its biblical echo is only one of the features which make this multilayered, beautifully crafted novel so enjoyable. There are hints of Faulkner, too, as Askew employs his technique of using a number of voices to tell the story: there is Mattie herself, mother before her time to her younger siblings, yet refusing to mature into a woman; there is Thula Henry, Choctaw woman who both understands Mattie's gifts and tries to exorcise her demons; and Grady Dewberry, loquacious son of John's employer recalling events that marked his childhood.

This is more than just a simple repositioning of the Snopes from Mississippi to Oklahoma, however. It is a vision of the settling of America with a deep and abiding appreciation for the combustible elements that participated in it. Evangelical preachers riding their circuits, Native Americans pushed farther and farther west, former slaves freed from their masters but not from prejudice, and white men on the run from the law of the more settled East, all figure prominently. Some patience is required as the central tragedy looms, but for the most part, the novel is poignant, gripping, and even heartbreaking. --K.A. Crouch

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:31 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

A girl's account of the violent life on the frontier. Mattie is 11 when her family moves from Kentucky to 1880s Oklahoma. After her mother dies, an uncle tries to get her father to abandon his honest job of shoeing horses for a life of crime, dealing in guns. By the author of Strange Business.… (more)

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