HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King
Loading...

Sleeping Beauties

by Stephen King, Owen King

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9774012,749 (3.59)46

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 46 mentions

English (38)  French (2)  All languages (40)
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
Oh, where to begin?
I am a Stephen King fan and have enjoyed his writing for years.
This book is not really a good read.
Starts well, and keeps your interest for a couple of chapters and then, it becomes too convoluted, too unreal, so much male and female bashing, is ridiculous.
Also, the story could have been told in half the amount of pages.
Totally disappointed.
Loved the Outsider, though. ( )
  sogamonk | Aug 26, 2018 |
3.5 rounded up ( )
  shan.blackman | Aug 21, 2018 |
While I don’t necessarily agree with other reviewers who disparage Stephen King’s latest release, Sleeping Beauties (co-authored with his son, Owen), I do agree that King has had trouble recently re-capturing the brilliance of his earlier works. I don’t know if that is because he has been so prolific that new ideas cannot come quickly enough, or if his “constant”readers have become jaded over the years. Whereas King was once a pioneer in the horror genre, many inferior copycats have perhaps stolen some of the magic. Sleeping Beauties is your standard King novel- filled with his signature realism and nonchalant acceptance of the fantastic. A slow build leads up to a cinematic finish that already screams out for a screenplay adaptation or (heaven forbid) another disappointing tv miniseries. As a clever retelling of the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale, the plot centers around a mysterious illness (spell?) that is causing the women of the world to fall into a comatose state. As more and more of them fall asleep, the remaining men are conflicted about how to handle the catastrophe. Needless to say, there are many themes to explore here about power dynamics and stereotypical gender “characteristics.” King and son do an admirable job handling the variety of responses without tripping too quickly over potential controversial landmines. Many negative comments have centered around the length and number of characters in this book. I think of this as a response to the Game of Thrones Phenomenon: the more characters you introduce, the more casually you can kill them off. Even ones that seem to have been carefully crafted and pivotal are not safe from the grinding churn of events. It is a challenge to keep track of everyone, but the large cast provides for more plot twist possibilities and a greater feeling of immersion in the action. In my opinion, there is enough new here to satisfy ardent fans, but readers new to King would benefit greatly by exploring one of his earlier works before tackling this one. ( )
  jnmegan | Jul 31, 2018 |
Women are starting to fall asleep in the small Appalachian coal-mining town of Dooling. As a matter of fact, they are falling asleep all over the world. Once they fall asleep, they slowly become wrapped in a cocoon, and they don’t wake up. Soon, it is discovered that a woman in such a state must not be awakened. If she is, she becomes a crazed woman who murders anyone who tries to free her from the cocoon. Women all over the world struggle to stay awake.

Meanwhile, a mysterious and beautiful woman arrives in town. She can fall asleep and wake up without a cocoon enveloping her. She also has superior strength and telepathic abilities. Calling herself Eve, she is somehow related to the mysterious illness that is causing women to fall asleep. As the world becomes more and more male-only, violence wreaks havoc on the world. How can this woman help?

Stephen and Owen King effectively create a whole new realistic world peopled with very convincing characters, forming an unforgettable story. It is a timely story, too. During a time when violence and abuse against women are being brought to the forefront, the Kings write a book about a world without women and what it would be like. I found it to be insightful and honest. Sadly, I thought it often dawdled around uninteresting details. Otherwise, this book is quite an experience! ( )
  Sandralovesbooks | Jul 27, 2018 |
I'm a Stephen King fanatic, so of course I loved it. ( )
  feeroberts64 | Jun 21, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (18 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
King, Stephenprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
King, Owenmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bebber, FedericoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Esch, JeanTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kleinschmidt, BernhardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
It makes no difference if you're rich or poor

Or if you're smart or dumb.

A woman's place in this old world

Is under some man's thumb,

And if you're born a woman

You're born to be hurt.

You're born to be stepped on,

Lied to,

Cheated on,

And treated like dirt.

--Sandy Posey, "Born a Woman"

Lyrics by Martha Sharp
I say you can't not be bothered by a square of light!

--Reese Marie Dempster, Inmate #4602597-2

Dooling Correctional Facility for Women
She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.

--Sen. Addison "Mitch" McConnell, speaking of Sen. Elizabeth Warren
Dedication
In remembrance of Sandra Bland
First words
The moth makes Evie laugh.
Quotations
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Mais, en vérité, y avait-il un moment où les hommes n'avaient pas été déconcertés par les femmes ? Elles étaient la magie dont ils rêvaient, et parfois leurs rêves étaient des cauchemars.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 150116340X, Hardcover)

In this spectacular father/son collaboration, Stephen King and Owen King tell the highest of high-stakes stories: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?

In a future so real and near it might be now, something happens when women go to sleep; they become shrouded in a cocoon-like gauze. If they are awakened, if the gauze wrapping their bodies is disturbed or violated, the women become feral and spectacularly violent; and while they sleep they go to another place... The men of our world are abandoned, left to their increasingly primal devices. One woman, however, the mysterious Evie, is immune to the blessing or curse of the sleeping disease. Is Evie a medical anomaly to be studied? Or is she a demon who must be slain? Set in a small Appalachian town whose primary employer is a women’s prison, Sleeping Beauties is a wildly provocative, gloriously absorbing father/son collaboration between Stephen King and Owen King.

(retrieved from Amazon Tue, 07 Mar 2017 11:12:26 -0500)

In this father-son collaboration, the authors tell the story of what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men. Set in a small Appalachian town whose primary employer is a women's prison, in a future so real and near it might be now, something happens when women go to sleep. They become shrouded in a cocoon-like gauze. If they are awakened, if the gauze wrapping their bodies is disturbed or violated, the women become feral and spectacularly violent. While they sleep they go to another place. The men of our world are abandoned, left to their increasingly primal devices. One woman, however, the mysterious Evie, is immune to the blessing or curse of the sleeping disease. Is Evie a medical anomaly to be studied, or is she a demon who must be slain?… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.59)
0.5
1 4
1.5
2 14
2.5 2
3 35
3.5 20
4 56
4.5 4
5 22

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,970,052 books! | Top bar: Always visible