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As You Like It (The New Folger Library…
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As You Like It (The New Folger Library Shakespeare) (original 1623; edition 2004)

by William Shakespeare

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4,232441,175 (3.77)128
Member:ashbrau
Title:As You Like It (The New Folger Library Shakespeare)
Authors:William Shakespeare
Info:Simon & Schuster (2004), Mass Market Paperback, 320 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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As You Like It by William Shakespeare (1623)

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» See also 128 mentions

English (40)  German (2)  Swedish (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (44)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
I've been made aware that modernists like to write fiction that is basically plot-free, where the point is to entertain with beautiful, glorious language, not to excite or inform. One modernist, John Barth, has argued that what he is doing is more reactionary than modern, that he was merely returning to what masters like Cervantes and Rabelais did.

Or, in this case, Shakespeare. He had already written one nearly meta-fictional play, Love's Labour Lost, where witty people did nothing but talk wittily about life. He revised and improved the idea for this play, where a group of people hide in the Forest of Arden and do little but discourse of love and life. I loved it all, but especially the typically plucky heroine and the two polar opposite clowns. ( )
  Coach_of_Alva | Nov 23, 2014 |
More of Shakespear's drag king fetish; to hetero audiences, light entertainment only notable as the source of the "all the world's a stage" quote. ( )
  jhudsui | Nov 4, 2014 |
Fabulous language. "All the world's a stage" is just one of many quotable quotes. Very much a fairy tale, but the wonderful Rosalind and the beautiful words of Shakespeare has made it one of my favorite of his comedies thus far. ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 17, 2014 |
Had to read this in college so I could act the part of the bad brother Oliver in the College Play, and learned to enjoy, if not love, the bearded Bard. ( )
  Chris.Graham | Jul 30, 2013 |
I liked this play, which I had thought was something else when I first started it! I found the comedy to be of the milder type of making me smile rather than laugh but still fun. There are several famous speeches, most memorable being the one about the seven stages of life. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 26, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (148 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William Shakespeareprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bisson, Isabel J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brissenden, AlanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burchell, S.C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Church. EsmeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cunliffe, John WilliamEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Damon, Lindsay ToddEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dolan, Frances E.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dubrow, HeatherEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Furness, Horace HowardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Furness, Horace HowardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaston, Charles RobertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellerman, IvyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellogg, BrainerdEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lamar, Virginia A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neilson, William AllanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oliver, H JEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pitt, David G.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, J. C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verity, A. W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will but poor a thousand crowns, and, as thou sayest, charged my brother, on his blessing, to breed me well: and there begins my sadness.
Quotations
All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players.
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts...
The little foolery that wise men have makes a great show.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Duke Frederick has stolen the title and throne of his elder brother, Duke Senior. Duke Senior has taken up residence in the Forest of Arden with his band of loyal followers, leaving his daughter, Rosalind, behind at the court. Enter Orlando and Oliver de Boys, two brothers divided by their hatred for one another.… (more)

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714715, 0141012277

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