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Herzog on Herzog by Werner Herzog
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Herzog on Herzog

by Werner Herzog

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This is one long interview arbitrarily cut into chapters that follow the director’s films chronologically. To fully appreciate this I should have perhaps watched a few more of the films (something I plan to remedy) and realised that it only covers the feature films (I prefer his documentaries) Although saying that the questions allow Herzog to wax lyrical about the film making process, his relationships with some of his leading actors (especially Kinski) and many other tangential topics. This was an entertaining read despite not knowing some of the films in any depth (plot synopsis on Wikipedia was my friend here) and it is interspersed with photographs. However since Herzog has said that he doesn’t really differentiate between features and documentaries as they are all films and all tell a story it deems a little odd to ignore a significant body of his work. I feel that it only tells half the story, or perhaps less. Full of amusing, interesting and sometimes shocking anecdotes this is a great read for his fans and new devotees equally.

Overall – concentrates on the feature films rather than the documentaries, still Herzog speaks eloquently and is always interesting to listen to (or in this case read) ( )
  psutto | Mar 28, 2013 |
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There are so many obstacles in filmmaking, but the worst of all is the spirit of bureaucracy. You have to find your own way to battle this menace. You have to outsmart it, outnumber it, outfilm it. And, moreover, bureaucracy loves nothing more than paper. You have to keep feeding it, and even a forgery pleases the bureaucrats so long as it is on impressive looking paper.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0571207081, Paperback)

An invaluable set of career-length interviews with the German genius hailed by François Truffaut as “the most important film director alive”

Most of what we’ve heard about Werner Herzog is untrue. The sheer number of false rumors and downright lies disseminated about the man and his films is truly astonishing. Yet Herzog’s body of work is one of the most important in postwar European cinema.

His international breakthrough came in 1973 with Aguirre, The Wrath of God, in which Klaus Kinski played a crazed Conquistador. For The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Herzog cast in the lead a man who had spent most of his life institutionalized, and two years later he hypnotized his entire cast to make Heart of Glass. He rushed to an explosive volcanic Caribbean island to film La Soufrière, paid homage to F. W. Murnau in a terrifying remake of Nosferatu, and in 1982 dragged a boat over a mountain in the Amazon jungle for Fitzcarraldo. More recently, Herzog has made extraordinary “documentary” films such as Little Dieter Needs to Fly. His place in cinema history is assured, and Paul Cronin’s volume of dialogues provides a forum for Herzog’s fascinating views on the things, ideas, and people that have preoccupied him for so many years.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:23:46 -0400)

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