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The Fall of the Year (Yesterday's…
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The Fall of the Year (Yesterday's Classics) (edition 2017)

by Dallas Lore Sharp (Author), Robert Bruce Horsfall (Author)

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One of seven children, Dallas Lore Sharp was born in 1870 on a farm in Haleyville, New Jersey, where the pine barrens, the marshes of Maurice River, and the great river swamps stretched out around him. Here he made his first studies out-of-doors, which led him to make the acquaintance of an old naturalist and museum-maker, Professor J. W. P. Jenks of Brown University, in whose workshop in the College Museum he lived for three years. While in college Sharp continued his natural history studies under Professors Jenks and Packard, spending two of his summers at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole. After graduating from Brown in 1895 and Boston University School of Theology in 1899, he served as a Methodist minister, then as an assistant librarian before becoming a professor of English at Boston University. He wrote his first essay for The Youth's Companion at the age of 18, and went on to write dozens more, not only for The Youth's Companion, but also for The Outlook and The Atlantic Monthly. He published his first book, Wild Life Near Home, in 1901, followed quickly by A Watcher in the Woods (1903), which consisted of selections from Wild Life Near Home for younger readers. Three more volumes of essays, aimed at an older audience, appeared shortly: Roof and Meadow (1904), The Lay of the Land (1908), and The Face of the Fields (1911). Beyond the Pasture Bars, a selection for younger reader from Roof and Meadow, followed in 1914. Inspired by activities he shared with his four boys on an old farm on Mullein Hill in Hingham, Massachusetts, Sharp penned a series of four books on the seasons for middle school students: The Fall of the Year (1911), Winter (1912), The Spring of the Year (1912), and Summer (1914). The Things To Do, Things To See, and Things To Hear sections of these books were so popular that they were collected in a single volume, The Year Out of Doors (1915). And a collection of all four seasonal books, without the notes for teacher and student, was made available for reading at home, The Whole Year Round (1915). The famous naturalist, John Burroughs, writing in 1903, declared, "of all the nature books of recent years, I look upon Mr. Sharp's as the best." Book jacket.… (more)
Member:christyfaye
Title:The Fall of the Year (Yesterday's Classics)
Authors:Dallas Lore Sharp (Author)
Other authors:Robert Bruce Horsfall (Author)
Info:Yesterday's Classics (2017), 140 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Science, Nature Study, Form 2b, Seasons

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The Fall of the Year by Dallas Lore Sharp

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One of seven children, Dallas Lore Sharp was born in 1870 on a farm in Haleyville, New Jersey, where the pine barrens, the marshes of Maurice River, and the great river swamps stretched out around him. Here he made his first studies out-of-doors, which led him to make the acquaintance of an old naturalist and museum-maker, Professor J. W. P. Jenks of Brown University, in whose workshop in the College Museum he lived for three years. While in college Sharp continued his natural history studies under Professors Jenks and Packard, spending two of his summers at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole. After graduating from Brown in 1895 and Boston University School of Theology in 1899, he served as a Methodist minister, then as an assistant librarian before becoming a professor of English at Boston University. He wrote his first essay for The Youth's Companion at the age of 18, and went on to write dozens more, not only for The Youth's Companion, but also for The Outlook and The Atlantic Monthly. He published his first book, Wild Life Near Home, in 1901, followed quickly by A Watcher in the Woods (1903), which consisted of selections from Wild Life Near Home for younger readers. Three more volumes of essays, aimed at an older audience, appeared shortly: Roof and Meadow (1904), The Lay of the Land (1908), and The Face of the Fields (1911). Beyond the Pasture Bars, a selection for younger reader from Roof and Meadow, followed in 1914. Inspired by activities he shared with his four boys on an old farm on Mullein Hill in Hingham, Massachusetts, Sharp penned a series of four books on the seasons for middle school students: The Fall of the Year (1911), Winter (1912), The Spring of the Year (1912), and Summer (1914). The Things To Do, Things To See, and Things To Hear sections of these books were so popular that they were collected in a single volume, The Year Out of Doors (1915). And a collection of all four seasonal books, without the notes for teacher and student, was made available for reading at home, The Whole Year Round (1915). The famous naturalist, John Burroughs, writing in 1903, declared, "of all the nature books of recent years, I look upon Mr. Sharp's as the best." Book jacket.

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