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Beneath the Sugar Sky by Seanan McGuire
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Beneath the Sugar Sky

by Seanan McGuire

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Wayward Children (3)

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3923040,579 (4.02)26

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» See also 26 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
I can't recreate my original review, but it was mostly gushing anyway. This book took me completely by surprise, I remember. I had wanted something light to pass the time while helping my husband at a doll show. I ended up reading it in a single sitting, letting him take care of customers while I was lost in a fascinating candy world and reading intriguing backstories to the characters.

Little did I know that the characters are all about 90% backstory with their screen time not adding much to the 'present' at the school. That sounds bitchy, I know, but I loved this book and when I finally got a chance to read the first two books in the series I was disappointed there wasn't more substance to them.

That said, I still recommend them to fans of classic fantasy who want an author rooting around in the tropes box willy-nilly with fantastic results. It makes for great 'treat' reading. The fourth book has recently been released, covering the history of one of the more intriguing characters of the first book. Check it out at your local booksellers! That review is coming tomorrow.

Wayward Children

Next: 'In An Absent Dream'

Previous: 'Down Among the Sticks and Bones' ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 19, 2019 |
I honestly can't go too much into what this book is about as it could spoil portions of Every Heart a Doorway, but it's just as fantastic as every other book in the series. Back in the school, Beneath the Sugar Sky picks up shortly after the events of Every Heart and introduces us to some new students at the school; we also get to see more into a couple of the portal worlds that we have heard about in previous books. I can't wait to see where McGuire takes the story next year after the events of this book. ( )
  tapestry100 | Jan 30, 2019 |
I loved Every Heart A Doorway, but skipped the 2nd novella because it focused on characters and a world I didn't like much. You don't need to read that to read this newest installment of the Wayward Children series, which picks up soon after the 1st novella leaves off. I loved the quest through different realms that takes up much of this story, and I enjoyed the characters (both old and new) and how they each contributed in their own way. -1 star because I wished there was less convoluted debate about the orientation of realms on McGuire's Wicked/Virtuous,Nonsense/Logic axis. The concept was so cool in the first book, but the thrust of the series seems to increasingly be that no world ever plots out neatly on it, so the constant discussion and tweaks and arguments started to seem like wasted narrative real estate in what is already such a short story. ( )
  epaulettes | Jan 3, 2019 |
Reading this book, I thought, "Seannan McGuire gets me, she really really gets me!" ( )
  chavala | Dec 29, 2018 |
This third installment in Seanan McGuire’s Wayward Children series takes us in a very different direction if compared with its predecessors: where the other stories were based on oddity and darkness, Beneath the Sugar Sky strives for a lighter mood even though the core concept still carries a dramatic vein, but for this reason it does not seem to work as well as the previous tales, at least from my point of view.

We’re back at Eleanor West’s school where we meet a new character, Cora, who used to dwell in the Trenches as a mermaid: together with her friend Nadya – who comes from a different water world – she’s spending time near the school’s pond when a girl literally splashes out of nowhere in its waters. She’s Rini, daughter of the former pupil Sumi, who was killed in Every Heart a Doorway: due to the nature of Nonsense worlds, Sumi was able to give birth to a daughter before she died (and even before she was old enough to become a mother, at that), but now that Rini has become aware of her mother’s demise, she’s becoming the victim of entropy and disappearing bit by bit. Asking and obtaining the help of her mother’s fellow students, Rini proceeds to recover Sumi’s bones from the Halls of the Dead – where we meet again Nancy, happily back in her role as a fleshy statue – and then moves to her home world of Confection to find Sumi’s heart and soul and make her whole again, so that Rini can go on living.

Confection is a world entirely made of sugar, gingerbread and candy, but it hides a darker side because of the Queen of Cakes’ cruel rule, as she tries to bend reality to her own twisted desires; the Queen’s attempt to stop the group of friends from attaining their goal proves to be one of the biggest obstacles in their quest, and it almost costs them dearly, but still it’s not enough to imbue the story with the kind of drama that is this series’ trademark.

The spun-sugar and candy nature of Confection might have been an attempt to lighten the mood of the series, and the group’s adventures – despite the seriousness of the almost-impossible task they set themselves to – follow a strange, outlandish pattern that looks more confused than anything else and robs it of much of the urgency inherent in the quest itself: Rini’s piecemeal disappearance and her need to have her mother back feel more like narrative devices than the emotional signposts they should be, and I never truly felt any commitment to the kids’ mission or its final outcome.

If the narrative somewhat suffers from this change of tone, losing some of the smoothness I have come to expect from Seanan McGuire’s works, the characters fare no better: with the exception maybe of Christopher, about whom we learn a little more, the other “old hands” see practically no evolution in the course of the story, and the new ones like Cora become mere allegories for the issues the author wants to explore, which is a change of pace and intensity in McGuire’s usual way to address them. Until now I have always admired the way in which this writer choose to discuss important topics like diversity, perception of self, and so on, in a way that never felt preachy or heavy-handed, just laying down the basics and leaving to the readers the welcome task of thinking about them. Here though, Cora has to deal with the fact that she’s overweight and has always been stigmatized and mistreated because of it: this detail is mentioned practically every time she is the p.o.v. character, so that instead of being an issue that should lead us to deeper considerations, it becomes an annoying repetition that adds nothing to Cora’s psychological makeup as a person and in the end makes her appear as whiny, and shallow.

I missed the effortless dignity with which Seanan McGuire usually tackles the matters she cares about and drives home her message, and I believe this is one of the reasons I enjoyed Beneath the Sugar Sky less than I expected and less than it deserved. My hope is that this might be just a small bump along the road and that the next installments in this series will return to the kind of quality I’ve come to associate with this author.



Originally posted at SPACE and SORCERY BLOG ( )
  SpaceandSorcery | Dec 25, 2018 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Seanan McGuireprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cai, RovinaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Sugar, flour, and cinnamon won't make a house a home, / So bake your walls of gingerbread and sweeten them with bone. / Eggs and milk and whipping cream, butter in the churn, / Bake our queen a castle in the hopes that she'll return. -Children's Clapping Rhyme, Confection
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For Midori, whose doorway is waiting
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Children have always tumbled down rabbit holes, fallen through mirrors, been swept away by unseasonal floods or carried off by tornadoes.
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Beneath the Sugar Sky returns to Eleanor West's Home for Wayward Children. At this magical boarding school, children who have experienced fantasy adventures are reintroduced to the "real" world. Sumi died years before her prophesied daughter Rini could be born. Rini was born anyway, and now she's trying to bring her mother back from a world without magic.… (more)

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