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Intuïtie de kracht van denken zonder…
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Intuïtie de kracht van denken zonder erbij na te denken

by Malcolm Gladwell

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18,348352170 (3.74)207
How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.… (more)
Member:jankaldenbach
Title:Intuïtie de kracht van denken zonder erbij na te denken
Authors:Malcolm Gladwell
Info:Amsterdam Contact 2005
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
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Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell

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Showing 1-5 of 345 (next | show all)
We saw Malcolm Gladwell when he came to give a talk at U dub. It was a fascinating talk, and this is a fascinating book.
  librarymeanslove | Oct 1, 2020 |
3.5 *

This is Malcolm Gladwell's second book after [b:The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference|2612|The Tipping Point How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference|Malcolm Gladwell|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1473396980s/2612.jpg|2124255] and the second book of his I read in the space of a couple of weeks. Unsurprisingly, there are similarities in Gladwell's approach to his themes. He starts with an arresting anecdote, which he uses to introduce his subject. Then, after setting out the elements of his thesis, he addresses them one by one in the ensuing chapters, illustrating his points with intriguing examples, stories and references to psychological experiments.

In many ways, Gladwell's second book is even more ambitious than "The Tipping-Point". In the latter work, he sought to explain "cultural/social epidemics" or what makes a particular idea or product suddenly popular. In this book, he not only tries to explain what goes on in our minds when we make "snap judgments", but, as declared in the introduction "the third and most important task of this book is to convince you that our snap judgments and first impressions can be educated and controlled".

After reading the introduction, one would surely be forgiven for expecting this to be a "self-help book", a guide to harnessing the power of "thin slicing" or "making a little knowledge going a long way". The problem is that the book is nothing of the sort. Its initial message seems to be that "snap judgments" are great: art experts recognise forgeries when all evidence points to the contrary, a particular psychologist is able to predict the longevity of a marriage just by watching moments of a conversation between a couple - the list of such amazing examples just goes on. However, most of the book is then spent describing what can go wrong with snap judgments. And an awful lot can go wrong, apparently. Unconscious bias affects even the fairest of subjects, stress can turn us momentarily "autistic", some matters just cannot be assessed through "first impressions". The conclusion seems to be that there are no magic solutions to these shortcomings - except becoming experts in our respective fields, being conscious of our unconscious bias (and consciously trying to overcome it) and training to either avoid or get used to stressful situations.

There's no denying Gladwell's flowing and entertaining style and I will treasure some of the insights contained in the book (I was particularly struck by the evidence for "unconscious bias"). However, at the end of this read I felt somewhat let down.

Thinking without thinking? Think again... ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Sep 12, 2020 |
Sometimes you just have to be lucky. When I was on the Olean campus, I happened to come upon a stack of books that appeared to be giveaways. They were all copies of Malcolm Gladwell’s book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. After asking around, I was able to get a copy. The one that I chose had marginalia throughout. I am always fascinated with what others are finding important in a book.

I am a fan of Malcolm Gladwell’s writing. Through the power of storytelling, he is able to illustrate important points worth keeping in mind. I have previously read his books David and Goliath as well as Outliers. I knew the Blink would be another book worth reading. I was not disappointed. Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
Reminded me a bit of [a:Mary Roach|7956|Mary Roach|http://photo.goodreads.com/authors/1212527264p2/7956.jpg]'s writing in [b:Bonk The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex|2082136|Bonk The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex|Mary Roach|http://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1348226205s/2082136.jpg|2398516]. It's a quick, interesting read with lots of anecdotes that keep the information from being dry. ( )
  bookbrig | Aug 5, 2020 |
The thesis is that intuition is much quicker at arriving at a correct decision than logic is, and may even be more accurate. However, it also get into how intuition can lead a person astray. (because of the prejudices based on stereotypes.)

The book goes into marketing success & failures. Finally on page 179 he gets into something different, something that explains an essential feature: "The first impression of experts are different. ... it is really only experts who are reliably able to account for their reactions." (p 179)

"Our unconscious reactions come out of a locked room, and we can't look inside that room. But with experience we become expert at using our behavior and our training to interpret -- and decode -- what lies behind our snap judgments and first impressions. It's a lot like what people do when they are in psychoanalysis: they spend years analyzing their unconscious with the help of a trained therapist until they begin to the a sense of how their mind works." (p 183)

"Much of our understanding of mind reading comes from two remarkable scientists, a teacher and his pupil: Silvan Tomkins and Paul Ekman. Tomkins was the teacher. ... and was the author of Affect Imagery, consciousness, a four-volume work so den`se that its readers were evenly divided between those who understood it and thought it was brilliant and those who did not understand it and thought it was brilliant." (p197-198)

"Ekman and Friesen decided, then and there, to create a taxonomy of facial expressions." (p 201)

"Ekman and Friesen ultimately assembled all these combinations and the rules for Reading and interpreting them -- into the Facial Action Coding System, of FACS, and wrote them up in a five- hundred page document. It is a strangely riveting work..." (p 204)

Section "3. The Naked Face" in chapter 6 "... he makes an even bolder claim... and that is that the information on our face is not just a signal of what is going on inside our mind. In a certain sense, it is what is going on inside our mind." (p 206)

"What we discovered is that expression alone is sufficient to create marked change in the autonomic nervous system." (p 206)

I expected the book to end with a few chapters on actions that a person can take to improve their use of intuitive (subconscious) decision making, but it didn't. The closest it came was to say that recognition of facial emotional expression was greatly improved by watching a (half hour?) video training course.

It did have a chapter about policemen making errors of judgement that are cured by slowing down, and claming that we are more likely to make such errors when adrenalin speeds up the HR to 170, and when we only have an extremely short time to make a judgement. As I recall, he put the optimal HR somewhere around 140 or perhaps a bit lower. ( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 345 (next | show all)
Beyond question, Gladwell has succeeded in his avowed aim. Though perhaps less immediately seductive than the title and theme of The Tipping Point, Blink satisfies and gratifies.
 
If you want to trust my snap judgment, buy this book: you'll be delighted. If you want to trust my more reflective second judgment, buy it: you'll be delighted but frustrated, troubled and left wanting more.
 
"Blink" brims with surprising insights about our world and ourselves, ideas that you'll have a hard time getting out of your head, things you'll itch to share with all your friends.
added by stephmo | editSalon.com, Farhad Manjoo (Jan 13, 2005)
 
You can't judge a book by its cover. But Gladwell had me at hello — and kept me hooked to the final page.
 
As a researcher, Gladwell doesn't break much new ground. But he's talented at popularizing others' research. He's a clever storyteller who synthesizes and translates the work of psychologists, market researchers and criminologists.
added by stephmo | editUSA Today, Bob Minzesheimer (Jan 10, 2005)
 

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To my parents, Joyce and Graham Gladwell
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In September of 1983, an art dealer by the name of Gianfranco Becchina approached the J. Paul Getty Museum in California. (Introduction)
Some years ago, a young couple came to the University of Washington to visit the laboratory of a psychologist named John Gottman.
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How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

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