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L'universo come opera d'arte. La fonte…
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L'universo come opera d'arte. La fonte cosmica della creatività umana (original 1995; edition 1997)

by John D. Barrow (Author)

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Title:L'universo come opera d'arte. La fonte cosmica della creatività umana
Authors:John D. Barrow (Author)
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The Artful Universe by John D. Barrow (1995)

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We are inveterate spectators.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0198539967, Hardcover)

Our likes and dislikes--our senses and sensibilities--did not fall ready-made from the sky, argues internationally acclaimed author John D. Barrow. We know we enjoy a beautiful painting or a passionate symphony, but what we don't necessarily understand is that these experiences conjure up latent instincts laid down and perpetuated over millions of years. Now, in The Artful Universe, Barrow explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe, challenging the commonly held view that our sense of beauty is entirely free and unfettered.
Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe, its environments and its astronomical appearance, have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? Who created the cornucopia of constellations in the night sky? And why? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in Nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Barrow reconsiders the question of whether intelligent extraterrestrial life exists, showing that the benefits (and even the likelihood) that might follow from the discovery of life on other worlds could be very different from what we might have been led to expect. Remarkably, we find that some of the properties of the Universe that are essential for the existence of any form of life play a key role in determining psychological and religious responses to the Cosmos.
Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science. It will change our view of the creation of art and the way we see the world in which we live.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:38:10 -0400)

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"In this wide-ranging exploration, John D. Barrow shows how our size, our form, and our aesthetic sensibilities are all moulded by the physical nature of the universe we inhabit. He explores the underlying mathematical relationships and patterns behind some of our art and music and their connections with natural forms, and draws out the ways in which the rhythms of our world - of day and night, and the yearly cycle of seasons - have impinged on the human psyche throughout history." "Originally published in 1995, this new edition has been updated and enlarged. From fundamental forces, multiverses, and evolution of complexity, to the patterns in the night sky, the beauty of vases, the music of Bach, Masaccio's use of perspective, and the fractal nature of Jackson Pollock's art, this book unveils a varied series of surprises that reveal how our existence and culture are framed and guided by the fundamental physical and mathematical structure of our artful universe."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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