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Circe: The Sunday Times Bestseller by…
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Circe: The Sunday Times Bestseller (original 2018; edition 2019)

by Madeline Miller (Author)

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1,8801065,533 (4.33)236
Member:Abendrot
Title:Circe: The Sunday Times Bestseller
Authors:Madeline Miller (Author)
Info:Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (2019), Edition: UK open market ed, 352 pages
Collections:Your library, To read
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Circe by Madeline Miller (2018)

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» See also 236 mentions

English (105)  Spanish (1)  All languages (106)
Showing 1-5 of 105 (next | show all)
While Circe will not be among my top books read this year, I did enjoy it. I liked where the author took the character of Circe. The prose was very good and the plot moved along at a nice clip. I particularly like how she portrays the Gods.

The book has all the elements of a 5 star read; yet, there is something missing for me and I am having a hard time putting my finger on. You could say, I didn't like it enough to want to read it again in the future. That is always the determining factor for me between a 4 and a 5 star book. In the end I think I would rate it as 4.3.

A lot of people loved this book and gave it 5 stars. Therefore, I feel confident in recommending this book to loves of Greek/Roman mythology and historical fiction. Furthermore, I believe it will appeal to readers of Historical Fiction. ( )
  purpledog | Jun 20, 2019 |
The second half was better than the first half. ( )
  aprille | Jun 9, 2019 |
Radiant, swift, and gripping. Smooth prose and perfect pacing set this grand and subtle myth above us mere mortals. So beautifully wrought, so inevitably realized, it is easy to forget how rare such work really is while under its spell. Worth it for any chapter alone. ( )
  Eoin | Jun 3, 2019 |
This was really a good book - I was not expecting to like it but I did. I normally read mystery/thrillers but there was just something about the cover of this book that intrigued me along with all the wonderful reviews. Turns out they were right! Now I'm looking forward to reading Song of Achilles! ( )
  debbiebellows | Jun 1, 2019 |
That was a whole big whup of nothing.

I read Miller's other Greek novel, Song of Achilles several years ago. I found it an incredibly dull adaptation of the Trojan War that sucked all the interest and life out of a pretty exciting and dramatic story. But Circe was so well-reviewed. New York Times loved it. My dad loved it! So I gave Madeline Miller another try.

Alas, Miller is up to her old fun-sucking tricks. See, there's no plot to Circe. There's no forward momentum of any sort. Rather, the novel drifts through the eponymous Circe's life, from one event to the next. Circe has an amazing talent at dropping in on random Greek myths that have absolutely nothing to do with her (she somehow manages to snag face time with no less than Prometheus, the Minotaur, and Medea). Through Circe's lens, these events because distant and dull, a thing that has happened to someone else that Circe just happened to play spectator for. While Circe's character certainly changes over the course of the novel, there's no real momentum or end goal in her character development. A thing happens, she reacts, and then the book moves on.

Because the thing is, books need forward momentum. If you're not going to focus on plot, then the characters need to provide the forward momentum. A book can rely on plot or characters or both, but it can't rely on nothing at all.

Reading Circe was rather like being stuck in a rowboat on a calm sea. You drift up and down and bob around, but you don't actually get anywhere. And after a while, the scenery gets really, really boring. ( )
  miri12 | May 31, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 105 (next | show all)
“Circe” will surely delight readers new to the witch’s stories as it will many who remember her role in the Greek myths of their childhood: Like a good children’s book, it engrosses and races along at a clip, eliciting excitement and emotion along the way.
 
Miller has taken the familiar materials of character, and wrought some satisfying turns of her own.
 
[W]hat elevates Circe is Miller’s luminous prose, which is both enormously readable and evocative, and the way in which she depicts the gulf between gods and mortals.
 
Written in prose that ripples with a gleaming hyperbole befitting the epic nature of the source material, there is nothing inaccessible or antiquated about either Circe or her adventures.
 
The character of Circe only occupies a few dozen lines of [the Odyssey], but Miller extracts worlds of meaning from Homer's short phrases.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Madeline Millerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Perdita WeeksNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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For Nathaniel
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When I was born, the name for what I was did not exist.
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When I was born, the name for what I was did not exist.
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Book description
In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child--not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power--the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.

Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.

But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love. Amazon
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In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child -- not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power -- the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves. Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus. But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love.… (more)

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