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Tangerine by Christine Mangan
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Tangerine (original 2018; edition 2018)

by Christine Mangan (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6353627,121 (3.33)42
NATIONAL BESTSELLER "A juicy melodrama cast against the sultry, stylish imagery of North Africa in the fifties." --The New Yorker The last person Alice Shipley expected to see since arriving in Tangier with her new husband was Lucy Mason. After the accident at Bennington, the two friends--once inseparable roommates--haven't spoken in over a year. But there Lucy was, trying to make things right and return to their old rhythms. Perhaps Alice should be happy. She has not adjusted to life in Morocco, too afraid to venture out into the bustling medinas and oppressive heat. Lucy--always fearless and independent--helps Alice emerge from her flat and explore the country.  But soon a familiar feeling starts to overtake Alice--she feels controlled and stifled by Lucy at every turn. Then Alice's husband, John, goes missing, and Alice starts to question everything around her: her relationship with her enigmatic friend, her decision to ever come to Tangier, and her very own state of mind. Tangerine is a sharp dagger of a book--a debut so tightly wound, so replete with exotic imagery and charm, so full of precise details and extraordinary craftsmanship, it will leave you absolutely breathless. Optioned for film by George Clooney's Smokehouse Pictures, with Scarlett Johansson to star… (more)
Member:Colesa
Title:Tangerine
Authors:Christine Mangan (Author)
Info:Little, Brown (2018), 320 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:None

Work details

Tangerine by Christine Mangan (2018)

  1. 10
    The Italian Party by Christina Lynch (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Both are about Americans abroad in the 1950s, with plots that depend on secrets and plots.
  2. 00
    Sunburn by Laura Lippman (sturlington)
  3. 00
    Her Daughter's Mother by Daniela Petrova (Micheller7)
  4. 00
    Girl Unknown by Karen Perry (Micheller7)
  5. 00
    The Comfort of Strangers by Ian McEwan (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Both are atmospheric novels set along the Mediterranean that involve psychological manipulation of foreign travelers by locals.
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» See also 42 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
Tough to get into this one. I just couldn’t relate and kept confusing the two female characters. Maybe it was just me and my current mindset, or maybe that was the whole intention, as I am thoroughly confused as to who is who at the end now! ( )
  purple_pisces22 | Mar 14, 2021 |
So much promise...not quite right...did not compare to the beauty of the cover or the descriptions of Tangiers. Disappointing ( )
  Betsy_Crumley | Jan 28, 2021 |
TANGERINE has been compared to an Alfred Hitchcock movie, and I guess you could say that throughout most of the book. The last few chapters, however, spoil that likeness.

Alice has been living of late with her husband in Morocco, Tangier, specifically. She is English and isn’t comfortable there, to say the least. Throughout the book the reader will learn in flashbacks how she has come to be so unhappy.

One day, her old college roommate, Lucy, an American, arrives unannounced at Alice’s door. Through the flashbacks we learn more and more about Lucy and why she has come to Tangier.

I have to be careful about divulging too much about the flashbacks because learning about these characters little by little adds to the anticipation and is how, I’m sure, the book is meant to be read. But suffice it to say that the reader will come to understand the evil of one and the complete naïveté (or, as some may come to feel, stupidity) of the other.

The last few chapters of TANGERINE are difficult to read. So much is left unsaid that the reader just may feel like throwing the book across the room. Maybe a sequel is coming to explain all the loose ends. ( )
  techeditor | Jan 24, 2021 |
Read for my work book club.

It is the story of Alice and Lucy. A pychological thriller set in 1950s Tangier. Reminds me a bit of Nicci French or Sophie Hannah.

Alice has moved to Tangier with her husband. An old college friend Lucy turns up unexpectedly. Turns out Lucy is a bit of a pycho - or is she? Maybe Alice is paranoid?

The book is quite light. Leaves a few unanswered questions at the end. Skips along. Seemed to be written with a film in mind. Indeed a film has been announced.

( )
  mick745 | Apr 8, 2020 |
I can see why there are comparisons to Patricia Highsmith because this reminded me throughout the book of the Talented Mr. Ripley. The main character's last name is even the soundalike, Shipley. That kind of put me off, I think. I wouldn't say derivative, as I don't want to seem too negative, but it was not exactly inspired either. To call it inspired would imply a freshness that this story lacked.

The set up was promising and I like stories with unreliable narrators and this one has 2, which was a challenge, but did push me to finish. However, I didn't feel the last few chapters were as strong as the earlier ones and the writing became more ambiguous as it reached the end, and as a result, it was a frustrating ending. Maybe that was the author's intent, and it certainly had the vagueness of an old movie ending, hence the Hitchcock reference by Oates placed on the cover. I like my books to resolve clearer, making connections that were there all along, clues for me to catch which, as a reader, makes me feel I connected to the author's intent. That's my preference for this type of mystery novel, so I didn't care for the ending, which felt hasty and vague. There was even a character that showed up and seemed like he was going to be important and then never returned like he was part of an earlier draft maybe.

I just didn't know what this story wanted to be and in the end, I was not satisfied that the author did either. 2 stars because I finished it, but I won't be handing it to my friends and family. ( )
  ThiaCoan | Jan 9, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
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For my parents, who always believed this was possible.
And for R. K., always.
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It takes three men to pull the body from the water. (Prologue)
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"You cry when you arrive, and you cry when you leave."
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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NATIONAL BESTSELLER "A juicy melodrama cast against the sultry, stylish imagery of North Africa in the fifties." --The New Yorker The last person Alice Shipley expected to see since arriving in Tangier with her new husband was Lucy Mason. After the accident at Bennington, the two friends--once inseparable roommates--haven't spoken in over a year. But there Lucy was, trying to make things right and return to their old rhythms. Perhaps Alice should be happy. She has not adjusted to life in Morocco, too afraid to venture out into the bustling medinas and oppressive heat. Lucy--always fearless and independent--helps Alice emerge from her flat and explore the country.  But soon a familiar feeling starts to overtake Alice--she feels controlled and stifled by Lucy at every turn. Then Alice's husband, John, goes missing, and Alice starts to question everything around her: her relationship with her enigmatic friend, her decision to ever come to Tangier, and her very own state of mind. Tangerine is a sharp dagger of a book--a debut so tightly wound, so replete with exotic imagery and charm, so full of precise details and extraordinary craftsmanship, it will leave you absolutely breathless. Optioned for film by George Clooney's Smokehouse Pictures, with Scarlett Johansson to star

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