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The Secret Plot to Save the Tsar: New Truths…
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The Secret Plot to Save the Tsar: New Truths Behind the Romanov Mystery

by Shay McNeal

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History of the Romanovs has led to many stories of their death or possible "escape". This book researches the possibility of certain family or friends that may have planned or just had in their power to try and save the last Tsar of Russia of eminent doom.

I got about halfway through the book and I understood the author was examining plots by many people to save the Tsar. Near the end I was able to follow because some of the story was told as a story. As I discussed the book with my husband he said it sounds like a scholarly book, which I have to agree with.

Most of book is a list of names and people would, or tried to save the Tsar. The first half was more like putting a piece of furniture together. Part A agrees with part B so they try to connect with Part C and it does not come together. The second half of the book the was some familiarity as I read the last days of the Tsar and family then near the end it becomes similar to the beginning as we read about the theories of other books by other authors whether any of the family did survive.

In all the book was too impersonal. I wanted to know more what the author thought in the end. I also wish the beginning had been written in a way that connected the story together and not just a bunch of names of people I did not know, although some I did. ( )
  lavenderagate | May 31, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0688169988, Hardcover)

The tragic fate of the Romanovs is well known: on July 17, 1918, the Tsar, his wife, their four daughters and ailing heir were led down to a basement in Ekaterinburg, Russia, and murdered in cold blood by a Bolshevik firing squad. The DNA analysis and identification of the bones were the conclusive proof the world was waiting for, and the case was considered closed. Until now.

Shay McNeal's controversial, groundbreaking new account challenges this accepted view. She presents convincing new scientific analysis questioning the authenticity of the "Romanov" bones and uncovers an extraordinary tale of espionage and double dealing that has been kept secret for more than eighty years.

Based on extensive study of American, Allied and Bolshevik documents, including recently declassified intelligence files, McNeal reveals the existence of a shadowy group of operatives working at the highest levels of the Allied, Bolshevik and German governments to free the Imperial family and guide them to safety.

Most controversially, McNeal believes that one of the plots to rescue the Tsar and his family may, possibly, have succeeded -- and she has compelling evidence to support it.

Told with the pace of a thriller, this highly readable and vigorously researched book forces a dramatic reappraisal of one of the most enduring mysteries of the twentieth century.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:49 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The tragic fate of the Romanovs is well known: on July 17, 1918, the Tsar, his wife, their four daughters and ailing heir were led down to a basement in Ekaterinburg, Russia, and murdered in cold blood by a Bolshevik firing squad. The DNA analysis and identification of the bones were the conclusive proof the world was waiting for, and the case was considered closed. Until now. Shay McNeal's controversial, groundbreaking new account challenges this accepted view. She presents convincing new scientific analysis questioning the authenticity of the "Romanov" bones and uncovers an extraordinary tale of espionage and double dealing that has been kept secret for more than eighty years. Based on extensive study of American, Allied and Bolshevik documents, including recently declassified intelligence files, McNeal reveals the existence of a shadowy group of operatives working at the highest levels of the Allied, Bolshevik and German governments to free the Imperial family and guide them to safety. Most controversially, McNeal believes that one of the plots to rescue the Tsar and his family may, possibly, have succeeded -- and she has compelling evidence to support it. Told with the pace of a thriller, this highly readable and vigorously researched book forces a dramatic reappraisal of one of the most enduring mysteries of the twentieth century.… (more)

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