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So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma…
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So You Want to Talk About Race (edition 2019)

by Ijeoma Oluo (Author)

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1,1094512,926 (4.46)51
"A current, constructive, and actionable exploration of today's racial landscape, offering straightforward clarity that readers of all races need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide. In So You Want to Talk About Race, Editor at Large of The Establishment, Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans. Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, and Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word.""--… (more)
Member:jSummer
Title:So You Want to Talk About Race
Authors:Ijeoma Oluo (Author)
Info:Seal Press (2019), Edition: Reprint, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
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So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

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» See also 51 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
Excellent. Should be read by every white person in America, and everywhere. Heck, everyone of every race should read it.

Audiobook note :excellent narrator ( )
  marshapetry | Oct 16, 2020 |
this is another really good intro, basic book for people who are looking not just to understand all the different issues in a racist america, but also a few ways to address it. she doesn't work too hard to convince you that these things are true or are happening, so if you need convincing, this book would probably not be a first step, but a second. she does give nice examples from her own life of the kinds of issues she is talking about, so it makes it easier to relate to what she means or gives someone a way to imagine the kinds of hurt she's talking about in real-life examples.

this is a really easy entry for white people, because she speaks very gently to us; it seems she is working hard to not turn off or offend white folks, and trying to engage us. i wonder how much this is her real voice, even as she has said that she's lost so much of the pandering she was doing for so long. either way, she definitely makes this more accessible (with her writing and her tone) for many people who might otherwise be turned off.

she hits many questions here that give people a great jumping off place to delve more deeply into. she relies on people to do their own further research but gets us all started. it's a good book for intro issues and to start people on a path to learning to be anti-racist and less oppressive and more supportive of people of color.

"I hope that if... [you are uncomfortable], you can sit with that discomfort for a while, to see if it has anything to offer you."

"'Why do you think black people are poor? Do you think it's for the same reasons that white people are?'"

"Race was not only created to justify a racially exploitative economic system, it was invented to lock people of color into the bottom of it. Racism in America exists to exclude people of color from opportunity and progress so that there is more profit for others deemed superior."

"Systemic racism is a machine that runs whether we pull the levers or not, and by just letting it be, we are responsible for what it produces. We have to actually dismantle the machine if we want to make change."

"As long as racism exists to ruin the lives of countless people of color, it should be something that upsets us. But it upsets us because it exists, not because we talk about it. And if you are white, and you don't want to feel any of that pain by having these conversations, then you are asking people of color to continue to bear the entire burden of racism alone."

"Our police forces were not created to protect Americans of color, but to control Americans of color. People of color were seen by police as an inconvenience at best, and a threat at worst, but never as people to protect and serve. This desire to control the behavior of people of color along with disregard for the lives of people of color has been woven throughout the history of American policing."

"When talking about police brutality, it is important to remember that the police force can be trustworthy public servants to one community, and oppressors to another community - just as we can live in a country that promotes prosperity for some and poverty for others. And this can be the same police force and the same country, without making any of these realities invalid. While numbers show that people of color are disproportionately targeted by police, they also show that white people in general trust and admire police. Both these statistics are true."

"We should not have a society where the value of marginalized people is determined by how well they can scale often impossible obstacles that others will never know."

"This is not an easy process, and it is not at all fun. And at times, it seems never-ending. At times it may seem like no matter what you do, you are doing something wrong. But you have to try to adjust to the feelings of shame and pain that come from being confronted with your own racism. You have to get over the fear of facing the worst in yourself. You should instead fear unexamined racism. Fear the thought that right now, you could be contributing to the oppression of others and you don't know it. But do not fear those who bring that oppression to light. Do not fear the opportunity to do better." ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Sep 21, 2020 |
This is an important book, and I feel that it gets stronger as it goes on. (How could it not? The start is partly about defining the terms we are going to be talking about, and definitions are critically important, but not always the most engaging thing to read about.) I really, REALLY appreciate that Oluo gives the most page time to her own lived racial experiences as a Black woman, but does not ignore the fact that there is also racism against other races that impact people as well. As a member of the East Asian diaspora, I was very glad to see that the "model minority" myth was addressed and used as an example of why intersection and inclusion matters, without becoming the focus of the book. This particular book was written for me, and people like me, but it is not about me. I'm glad I read it, especially that last chapter. We need to talk about race—but, as the final chapter reminds us, we also need to take action. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Sep 10, 2020 |
Narrated by Bahni Turpin. Wish I had started my anti-racism self-education with this title. A very approachable but brutally honest work that addresses those sticky questions hovering in our mental corners of bias and racism. She covers topics such as tone policing, the model minority myth, defines intersectionality, and several other key themes to know if you are interested in doing the work of dismantling racism. Turpin's presentation is spot on for the subject, being appropriately friendly, humorous, righteous, or stern as the context demands. A must-read! ( )
  Salsabrarian | Aug 17, 2020 |
Fantastic book. This book really made me think, and gave me some useful tools to deal with the racism in my own community. My favorite suggestion was to explain how some action is harmful instead of just saying "that's racist" and leaving it at that. This has helped me have more productive conversations. I also previously did not think "cultural appropriation" was a real thing: now Ms. Oluo has convinced me it is an actual thing that happens (although I think the term is widely misused). I would recommend this book to anybody trying to understand the modern anti-racist movement, or trying to have more productive conversations with the people in their life about racism. ( )
  Rachel_Hultz | Aug 15, 2020 |
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"A current, constructive, and actionable exploration of today's racial landscape, offering straightforward clarity that readers of all races need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide. In So You Want to Talk About Race, Editor at Large of The Establishment, Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans. Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, and Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word.""--

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