HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Writer Got Screwed (but didn't have to):…
Loading...

The Writer Got Screwed (but didn't have to): Guide to the Legal and…

by Brooke A. Wharton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
432267,810 (3.25)None
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 2 of 2
A book for would-be screen writers, to help them navigate the shark-infested waters of the film industry. I read it as a playwright, so there were a great many things that did not apply to me, but the first few chapters, especially on copyright and protecting your work, can be important for any writer. The author, an entertainment lawyer, avoids the language of legalese,and in fact, translates some standard industry contracts into English for the rest of us, with her tongue pressed tightly into her cheek and more than a small bit of humor. The interviews with professionals, however, are not particularly helpful and appear to have been tacked into a short book to give it some heft and get it to full book size. The final chapter, on writing for cyberspace, is hopelessly out of date, since the book was released in 1996, and the industry has had some seismic shifts since that time. All in all, a valuable work, at least in parts, and while the list of contacts she gives at the end are also out of date, they do help by giving you some sort of idea what you should be looking for. ( )
  quantum_flapdoodle | Aug 2, 2013 |
This book is now joined by Wharton's website/blog: brookewharton.com(rated in top 10 for film blogs). Entertainment lawyer Brooke A. Wharton provides an authoritative and entertaining primer for the beginning entertainment writer not just on the legal and business issues of writing for the industry, but also on how to get a career jump-started. The first section covers copyright, libel, and contracts. The following section delineates the murky differences between the roles of agent, lawyer, and manager. The next section has a series of interviews with writers, agents, and a producer, all of whom help to enlighten us about the various writing jobs the industry offers, from film to television to cyberspace. Finally, there are lists of competitions, fellowships, internships, and agencies.
  mmckay | Jun 3, 2006 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0062732366, Paperback)

You've got to love a lawyer who advises, "Don't make your lawyers rich." Entertainment lawyer Brooke A. Wharton provides an authoritative and, yes, entertaining primer for the beginning entertainment writer not just on the legal and business issues of writing for the industry, but also on how to get a career jump-started. The first section covers copyright, libel, and contracts, so that if you can't "control the exploitation of your scripts and written work ... at least [you'll] know when you're being screwed." The following section delineates the murky differences between the roles of agent, lawyer, and manager. The gist of it is that you don't need all three, but which ones you need depends on the type of person you are and the type of agents/lawyers/managers they are (industry insiders are not prone to job-title limitations). The next section has a series of interviews with writers, agents, and a producer, all of whom help to enlighten us about the various writing jobs the industry offers, from film to television to cyberspace. (If you're surprised to learn that "most writers working in the film industry do not make their living from the sale of a spec screenplay," I've got a good deal for you on some land in Florida.) Finally, there are lists of competitions, fellowships, internships, and agencies. And what about jump-starting that glamorous career? Contacts, baby. Contacts. And wouldn't you know, if you ain't got 'em, Wharton's got great advice on how to make 'em.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:37:04 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
6 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.25)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,510,143 books! | Top bar: Always visible