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The Pillowman by Martin McDonagh
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The Pillowman (2004)

by Martin McDonagh

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Gallows humour, and a steady, unpleasant look at cruelty, and deception. Not precisely metafiction but perhaps a commentary on metafiction, and also on: the influence we have on one another, to the point of complicity; storytelling, and its pedigree of brutality.

I remind myself: there is what people write (say), and there is what people do. McDonagh examines each separately and in resonance. ( )
  elenchus | Jan 29, 2014 |
Gloriously dark and messed up as expected from McDonagh, a favourite playwright of mine, but the albeist language was tough to take in, even if it was fitting for the characters.
  Ceilidhann | Sep 20, 2013 |
This play must certainly be one of those most bittersweet of works: a work of such breathtaking genius that the author will probably never write anything to match it again. The story of a young writer questioned by the police regarding some short stories he's written, and the role they believe he played in the murder of young children, the story unwinds through a series of plot twists narrated by the stories the man has written, which illustrate the murders that have occurred, and ultimately pin the guilt on the culprit. The stories themselves are a treasure, as the writer gives us a combination of theatrical writing and short story composition that mesh nicely into a work that rivals Hamlet for its power and genius. ( )
1 vote quantum_flapdoodle | May 23, 2013 |
Everybody was reading "The Cripple of Inishmaan" in Ireland, and I was rolling my eyes, thinking that I could not handle more Synge. This guy is not Synge. ( )
  usefuljack | May 17, 2013 |
Everybody was reading "The Cripple of Inishmaan" in Ireland, and I was rolling my eyes, thinking that I could not handle more Synge. This guy is not Synge. ( )
1 vote usefuljack | May 17, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0822221004, Paperback)

While still in his twenties, the Anglo-Irish playwright Martin McDonagh has filled houses in New York and London, been showered with the theatre world's most prestigious accolades, and electrified audiences with his cunningly crafted and outrageous tragicomedies. With echoes of Stoppard and Kafka, his latest drama, The Pillowman, is the viciously funny and seriously disturbing tale of a writer in an unnamed totalitarian state who is interrogated about the gruesome content of his short stories and their similarities to a number of child-murders occurring in his town.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:59:02 -0400)

"A writer in a totalitarian state is interrogated about the gruesome content of his short stories and their similarities to a number of child-murders that are happening in his town."--BOOK JACKET.

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