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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (1900)

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English (236)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  All languages (239)
Showing 1-5 of 236 (next | show all)
The Wizard of Oz is about a girl named Dorothy who travels to a new place called Oz. There she meets a scare crow, a tin man, and a lion. Unbeknownst to them, they are all on a journey of self-discovery. Through trials and tribulations they all become stronger people than when they started their journey. The theme of this story is about exploring one’s inner strength and being self-reliant.
I think this book would be good for students for several reasons. One lesson that could be taught using the book is comparing and contrasting. I would read the book to the students first and then have them watch the movie. I would ask them to compare and contrast the book with the movie. Some questions I would ask would include, if the stories changed at all and if the pictures in the book looked anything like the movie. If there were changes, why do the students thing they were made? This book is also good for talking about social studies. This book comments on the great depression and what people were going through at the time. One of the most noticeable differences in this book is Dorothy’s shoes are silver, while she walks on the yellow brick road. She also receives a golden helmet, which isn’t in the movie at all.
The illustrations in this book are beautifully done and really are the stars of the book. The main issue the book has is that it’s too long. The book is ninety-six pages, so a reading of it in class will probably take a few class periods. ( )
  tahamilton | Jan 25, 2015 |
It's a travesty that this book has been eclipsed by the 1939 movie made of it. Whereas the movie is a simple morality tale, the book is full of delicious ironies; two in particular that stand out are
1) the Emerald City's not actually being emerald, and
2) the fact that Dorothy's three companions clearly possess in spades the qualities which they believe themselves to lack.
How could a man wearing a silly looking lion costume ever properly represent the fearsome Lion from this book? ( )
1 vote Audacity88 | Jan 12, 2015 |
(6.9)
  mshampson | Jan 12, 2015 |
The wizard of OZ, Exceptional, best book ever, i also found the book more exciting than the movie, there is no better way to pass time with your daughter than reading this book, I have always been a fan of the film, only recently I read the book for the first time. Due to starting work in a library, I have read many books over the Christmas period why so many reviews from me so soon, I find it hard to understand anybody that does not love the Wizard of OZ theme, for me personally it is the greatest story of them all. Five star forever! ( )
  Claire5555 | Jan 6, 2015 |
Almost everyone I know is familiar with the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz starring Judy Garland, while far fewer are the people who’ve also read the book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. I read Ozma of Oz in 2003, thus familiarizing myself in the weird and wonderful ways that Oz exists. Ozma is book three in a series that began with Wonderful Wizard and continued on for thirteen more books. They are in the public domain and are frequently republished as classics and revisited as seen in the SyFy miniseries Tin Man or the book Wicked by Gregory Maguire.

I will provide a summary of the book for those who are unfamiliar with it. You can skip to the next paragraph if you’ve heard this before: there is a little girl, named Dorothy, who lives with her Aunt and Uncle in a very grey and flat part of Kansas, a state in the United States. A terrible twister comes upon their farm and before Dorothy can get into the storm cellar, she is knocked to the floor of her house and carried away, with the entire house, by the Twister. After a long time traveling in the quiet eye of the storm the house lands, and upon stepping outside in a bright and strange world she is heralded a heroine. Apparently her house landed on a wicked witch who had been terrorizing the inhabitants of Munchkinland. After taking the silver slippers from the witches feet and asking how she can get back to Kansas, she is directed to the Emerald City in which The Wonderful Wizard of Oz resides. If the Wizard cannot help her, no one can. Along the way she comes across a man made out of tin, a talking scarecrow and a lion who is the most cowardly beast in the forest. Together they make it to the Emerald City where nothing is exactly as it seems and they are sent on another quest, to kill the last wicked witch of Oz.

That isn’t even the end of the story — and it’s not a very long book!

The book and this particular audiobook, narrated by Anne Hathaway in Audible.com’s a-list series, where well-known actors and actresses read their favorite novels, really seems intended for children. Frank L. Baum reputedly wrote these books as modern fairy tales when he began in 1901. Anne Hathaway reportedly thought of her nieces when she recorded the audiobook. I wish I had gotten to these books a little earlier in my life.

Anne Hathaway does a wonderful job bringing all the characters and creatures along Dorothy’s journey to life. Her accents and flamboyance are colorful and right in line with the overall tenor of the book: variety is the spice. Particularly memorable are her raspy scarecrow and valley-girl flamingo. Unfortunately this audio version is only available from Audible as a download — no possibility to borrow from the library.

Considering how easy it is to get your hands on these books — here, links to the series on Gutenberg — I’m going to read the rest soon. Unlike other old children’s books, I find they hold up really well. A recent question about holding onto our childhood favorites for the wrong reasons, engraining in the young stories where girls are often passive, made me rethink my determination to read more of the older ‘classical’ books I’ve heard lauded for years. Here’s the quote:
Female characters in books that are for "everyone" are often marginalized, stereotyped or one-dimensional. Especially in traditional favorites that are commonly highlighted in schools and libraries. For example, Peter Pan's Wendy is a stick-in-the-mud mother figure and Tiger Lily is a jealous exotic. Or, take Kanga, from Winnie the Pooh. There is nothing wrong with these books per se; they are wonderful stories, and they reflect a reality of their times, but continuing to give them preference -- out of habit, tradition, nostalgia -- in light of newer, more relevant and equitable stories is really not doing anyone any favors.
Here’s the source: What Does it Mean that Most Children's Books Are Still About White Boys?

I see The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a break from that generalization. It may not compare to Winnie the Pooh, but it certainly is a classic worth revisiting. ( )
1 vote knotbox | Dec 1, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (182 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
L. Frank Baumprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Anderson, WayneCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Biro, B.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Copelman, EvelynCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Denslow, William WallaceIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Engelbreit, MaryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Espinosa, GerardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Foreman, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gardner, MartinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Glassman, PeterAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Granger, PaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hague, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hathaway, AnneNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Helanen-Ahtola, MarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herring, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hildebrandt, GregCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingpen, Robert R.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Juva, KerstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krenkel, RoyCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krukenberg, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Magagna, Anna MarieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Müller, KlausCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McCurdy, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKee, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKowen, ScottCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rawle, GrahamCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schulz, Russell HCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scobie, TrevorCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ulrey, DaleCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weisgard, LeonardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wiesgard, LeonardCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zwerger, LisbethIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to my good friend and comrade, my wife L. F. B.
First words
Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife.
Quotations
"Take me home to Aunt Em!"
"Come along, Toto," she said. "We will go to the Emerald City and ask the great Oz how to get back to Kansas."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Please DO NOT combine film adaptations (DVDs, videos), or any abridged, young reader's, excerpted, anthologized, or other adaptations, with the work for the book. These are considered separate and distinct works for LibraryThing cataloging. Also please be careful when editing and deleting information in Common Knowledge, since this is common data that affects everyone in LibraryThing.
ISBN 0762416289 is a Courage Books edition of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Audie Award Nominee, Solo Narration - Female, 2013

One of the best-known stories in American culture, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has stirred the imagination of young and old alike for over 100 years. Best Actress nominee Anne Hathaway (Rachel Getting Married, Alice In Wonderland), fresh from filming one of this year’s most anticipated films, The Dark Knight Rises, lends her voice to this uniquely American fairy tale.

Follow the adventures of young Dorothy Gale and her dog Toto as they get swept away into the magical land of Oz , where they encounter characters and places you may remember from the movie – and several more that never made it to the big screen – on an unforgettable journey to the Emerald City.

“It’s such a wonderful book and I was so happy to be a part of bringing it to life”, Ms. Hathaway said. “There are a lot of great voices in it. The more fun you have with it, the sillier and the more free you get with it, the better it is because it’s a story that can handle it. It’s amazing to be able to discover something new about something you feel you know so well.”

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is part of Audible’s A-List Collection, featuring the world’s most celebrated actors narrating distinguished works of literature that each star had a hand in selecting.
Haiku summary
Headline: Kansas girl
Enters strange new land; at once
Starts a killing spree.

(Carnophile)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060293233, Hardcover)

One of the true classics of American literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has stirred the imagination of young and old alike for over four generations. Originally published in 1900, it was the first truly American fairy tale, as Baum crafted a wonderful out of such familiar items as a cornfield scarecrow, a mechanical woodman, and a humbug wizard who used old-fashioned hokum to express that universal theme, "There's no place like home."

Follow the adventures of young Dorothy Gale and her dog, Toto, as their Kansas house is swept away by a cyclone and they find themselves in a strange land called Oz. Here she meets the Munchkins and joins the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion on an unforgettable journey to the Emerald City, where lives the all-powered Wizard of Oz.

This lavishly produced facsimile of the rare first edition contains all 24 of W. W. Denslow's original color plates, the colorful pictorial binding, and the 130 two-color illustrations that help make The Wonderful Wizard of Oz so special and enduring.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:56:02 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

After a cyclone transports her to the land of Oz, Dorothy must seek out the great wizard in order to return to Kansas.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 57 descriptions

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Audible.com

33 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

5 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141180854, 0141321024, 0141808314, 0141341734, 0143106635

W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909438243, 1909438278

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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