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The Year of Endless Sorrows: A Novel by Adam…
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The Year of Endless Sorrows: A Novel

by Adam Rapp

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I wanted to like this book about an entry-level publishing worker in the early 90s but the stream of homophobic and misogynist language and plot choices and characterizations put me off (for some reason). Also the chapters and chapters of fart jokes. Also the anachronisms in a novel supposedly about its setting. Also the unironic and repeated use of the phrase "making love." Only for those who enjoy reading about self-pitying upper-middle class straight white men and their whimsical adventures in the city. ( )
  anderlawlor | Apr 9, 2013 |
This was definitely Adam Rapp's worst book, which is a shame -- his young adult novels are wonderful, but this was sorely lacking. Being Rapp, it was beautifully written, but it was also dull as dishwater. I spent the whole book waiting for something to happen, and nothing did. There was no suspense, no action, nothing but a trickle of beautiful and unusual phrases. Please, please just read Little Chicago or The Copper Elephant before you read this pretentious waste of paper. ( )
  meggyweg | Mar 4, 2009 |
I loved this book. Like all of the other Adam Rapp books I have read, it's quite depressing, though not as morbid as Little Chicago.

The story is about an aspiring author from Iowa who moves to the city to work on his novel. He deals with crazy roommates, heartbreaking romance, the dog eat dog world of working for a publishing company, STDs, depression, paying the rent, and all the other stuff that goes on in New York City.

I like that you never learn his name (though you learn every other personal aspect of his life), and even when nothing is actually happening, you're not bored because his writing is so beautiful. You get a scarily accurate insight into an author's mind.

It's also kind of cool to come across subtle or not-so-subtle allusions to Adam Rapp's real life.

I highly reccommend it. ( )
  iluvnooyawk | Oct 30, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374293430, Paperback)

New York City, the early 1990s: the recession is in full swing and young people are squatting in abandoned buildings in the East Village while the homeless riot in Tompkins Square Park. The Internet is not part of daily life; the term "dot-com" has yet to be coined; and people's financial bubbles are burst for an entirely different set of reasons. What can all this mean for a young Midwestern man flush with promise, toiling at a thankless, poverty-wage job in corporate America, and hard at work on his first novel about acute knee pain and the end of the world?

With The Year of Endless Sorrows, acclaimed playwright and finalist for the 2003 William Saroyan International Prize for Writing Adam Rapp brings readers a hilarious picaresque reminiscent of Nick Hornby, Douglas Copeland, and Rick Moody at their best--a chronicle of the joys of love, the horrors of sex, the burden of roommates, and the rude discovery that despite your best efforts, life may not unfold as you had once planned.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:36 -0400)

"Adam Rapp brings readers the joys of love, the horrors of sex, the burden of roommates, and the rude discovery that despite your best efforts, life may not unfold according to plan." "The pace: New York City. The time: The early 1990s. The recession is in full swing and young people are squatting in abandoned buildings in the East Village while the homeless riot in Tompkins Square Park. The Internet is not part of daily life; the term "dot-com" has yet to be coined, people's financial bubbles are burst for an entirely different set of reasons. Enter a young Midwestern man flush with promise, toiling at a thankless, poverty-wage job in corporate America and hard at work on his first novel about acute knee pain and the end of the world."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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