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Der Web-Report by Tim Berners-Lee
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Der Web-Report (edition 1999)

by Tim Berners-Lee, Mark Fischetti, Tim Berners-Lee (Author), Mark Fischetti (Author)

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6831013,982 (3.79)2
Member:timoheuer
Title:Der Web-Report
Authors:Tim Berners-Lee
Other authors:Mark Fischetti, Tim Berners-Lee (Author), Mark Fischetti (Author)
Info:Econ (1999), Gebundene Ausgabe
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:tim berners, web, internet, historie, biografie, www

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Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web by Tim Berners-Lee

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Berners-Lee writes a very fun and informative treatise on his experiences towards creating the Web as we utilize it today. The first nine chapters detail his background and history, up to his move to the United States. A lot of the material describing the internal workings of the CERN environment were absolutely compelling material. The rest of the book follows his work within the W3C, along with his long-range vision of the Web. While the book holds a time-frame of 1999/2000 - much of his observations still hold true today in 2013. ( )
  TommyElf | Mar 14, 2015 |
His Masters Voice.
  mdstarr | Sep 11, 2011 |
Writer Lev Grossman has chosen to discuss Tim Berners-Lee’s Weaving the Web: The Past, Present and Future of the World Wide Web by its Inventor on FiveBooks as one of the top five on his subject- The World Wide Web, saying that:


"...This book is extremely engaging and readable. It’s very similar in some ways to Francis Crick’sThe Double Helix, and he really just talks about where his invention came from, how it happened, and what everything you read about the history of the Internet tells you that a lot of it happened by accident...."


The full interview is available here: http://five-books.com/interviews/lev-grossman
( )
  FiveBooks | Mar 18, 2010 |
Not Read
  wlchui | Aug 2, 2009 |
His Masters Voice.
  muir | Dec 10, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 006251587X, Paperback)

If you can read this review (and voice your opinion about his book on Amazon.com), you have Tim Berners-Lee to thank. When you've read his no-nonsense account of how he invented the World Wide Web, you'll want to thank him again, for the sheer coolness of his ideas. One day in 1980, Berners-Lee, an Oxford-trained computer consultant, got a random thought: "Suppose all the information stored on computers everywhere were linked?" So he created a system to give every "page" on a computer a standard address (now called a URL, or Universal Resource Locator), accessible via the HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), formatted with the HyperText Markup Language (HTML), and visible with the first browser, which did the trick of linking us all up.

He may be the most self-effacing genius of the computer age, and his egalitarian mind is evident in the names he rejected for his invention: "I thought of Mine of Information, or MOI, but moi in French means 'me,' and that was too egocentric.... The Information Mine (TIM) was even more egocentric!" Also, a mine is a passive repository; the Web is something that grows inexorably from everyone's contributions. Berners-Lee fully credits the colorful characters who helped him get the bobsled of progress going--one colleague times his haircuts to match the solstices--but he's stubbornly independent-minded. His quest is to make the Web "a place where the whim of a human being and the reasoning of a machine coexist in an ideal, powerful mixture."

Hard-core tech types may wish Berners-Lee had gone into deeper detail about the road ahead: the "boon and threat" of XML, free vs. commercial software, VRML 3-D imaging, and such. But he wants everyone in on the debate, so he wrote a brisk book that virtually anyone can understand. --Tim Appelo

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:57 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, has been hailed by Time magazine as one of the 100 greatest minds of this century. His creation has already changed the way people do business, entertain themselves, exchange ideas, and socialize with one another. With new online businesses and communities forming every day, the full impact of Berners-Lee's grand scheme has yet to be fully realized. Now, this low-profile genius tells his own story of the Web's origins--from its radical introduction and the creation of the now ubiquitous WWW and HTTP acronyms to how he sees the future development of this revolutionary medium. Berners-Lee offers insights to help listeners understand the true nature of the Web, enabling them to use it to their fullest advantage. He shares his views on such critical issues as censorship, privacy, and the increasing power of software companies in the online world.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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