HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

My Year of Rest and Relaxation (2018)

by Ottessa Moshfegh

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0775913,347 (3.62)63
"From one of our boldest, most celebrated new literary voices, a shocking and tender novel about a young woman's efforts to sustain a state of deep hibernation over the course of a year on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Our narrator should be happy, shouldn't she? She's young, thin, pretty, a recent Columbia graduate, works an easy job at a hip art gallery, lives in an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan paid for, like the rest of her needs, by her inheritance. But there is a dark and vacuous hole in her heart, and it isn't just the loss of her parents, or the way her Wall Street boyfriend treats her, or her sadomasochistic relationship with her best friend, Reva. It's the year 2000 in a city aglitter with wealth and possibility; what could be so terribly wrong? My Year of Rest and Relaxation is a powerful answer to that question. Through the story of a year spent under the influence of a truly mad combination of drugs designed to heal our heroine from her alienation from this world, Moshfegh shows us how reasonable, even necessary, alienation can be. Both tender and blackly funny, merciless and compassionate, it is a showcase for the gifts of one of our major writers working at the height of her powers"--… (more)
  1. 10
    The New Me by Halle Butler (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Both novels share razor-sharp writing, a deeply unsympathetic protagonist and an eye for the less savory parts of daily existence.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 63 mentions

English (53)  Piratical (1)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (56)
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
I just loved this book, it was like being in the room with her. I loved the honest portrayal of thoughts, their brutality, their vulnerability, and their unbidden-ness. I loved the idea of removing oneself from ones life but being able to come back regenerated. I was jealous in no small measure. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
Some years ago, I decided to reread The Catcher in the Rye; I suspected that my older self would find it overrated but I was surprised to find it far more applicable to middle age than to my reading it as a cavalier kid. After all, how would a school boy appreciate the depths of depression and grief that Holden Caulfield was enduring? So, imagine my surprise in finding an unlikely connection between young Holden and the unnamed narrator of this novel. She is a young, very pretty, and a rather wealthy Manhattanite, made rich by the death of her rich parents. She is also depressed to the point of being catatonic. And how does she cope? She hibernates into a cocoon of pharmaceuticals, her lunatic therapist (who gives her prescriptions), one bulimic friend, and the Egyptians staffing a nearby bodega, where she buys her coffee and sundries. Her looks get her a position of ennui inside a 'cutting edge' art gallery, her therapist is the most comical and worst in the entire world, and her 'bestie' has even more issues than she does. And, as the year passes, her acquired drug fueled routine takes on the bleakest comedic aspect imaginable, save for the overall tonality of torpor, depression, and futility. No mistake about it: the story herein is so morbid and dark that it eventually takes on a comedic sensibility that is overwhelming! So funny! (And also, a manual about better living through chemistry!) ( )
  larryking1 | Sep 19, 2020 |
We never learn her name but her privileged background can't keep her from experiencing remarkable loss. Her grief & depression (words she never uses) has sparked a very fitting and unique "project" that is seems like it would be a dream, but is it?
Moshfegh's telling is heartbreaking, maddening and laugh out loud funny; this beautifully odd novel is one you'll fall for and will keep you up late reading. ( )
  ShannonRose4 | Sep 15, 2020 |
We never learn her name but her privileged background can't keep her from experiencing remarkable loss. Her grief & depression (words she never uses) has sparked a very fitting and unique "project" that is seems like it would be a dream, but is it?
Moshfegh's telling is heartbreaking, maddening and laugh out loud funny; this beautifully odd novel is one you'll fall for and will keep you up late reading. ( )
  ShannonRose4 | Sep 15, 2020 |
In Haruki Murakami's [b:After Dark|17803|After Dark|Haruki Murakami|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1437952316s/17803.jpg|3070852] we meet Eri, an attractive young woman who has decided to “go to sleep”, and who lies in bed in a sort of suspended animation, a cross between a latter-day Snow White and Sleeping Beauty. Murakami's is a magical world, and typically, no explanation is given to us as to the why and how of this extraordinary event.

Not so in Ottessa Moshfegh's latest novel. Its narrator is a 24-year old Columbia graduate who, having last her parents in close succession, and disillusioned with the art scene in which she works (and with the world in general) decides to undergo a self-imposed regime of 'sleep therapy'. There are those who, faced with an existential crisis, go on a retreat or undergo a spiritual epiphany. Instead, over a 12-month period between 2000 and 2001, the novel's protagonist goes into near-hibernation, with the help of a mind-numbing list of mind-numbing substances. These are conveniently prescribed and sometimes supplied by her psychiatrist Dr Tuttle : There was no shortage of psychiatrists in New York City, but finding one as irresponsible and weird as Dr Tuttle would be a challenge... Solfoton, Ambien, Robitussin, Nembutal, Zyprexa - anything to go to sleep. And then there's Infermiterol - the closest we get to a magic potion in this book. Each pill sends the narrator on a three-day long bout of sleepwalking, of which no memory remains after the event except for photographs evidencing nights of riotous hedonism.

This novel is an uncompromising work. It displays acerbic wit and a strong dose of black humour, but whether this will provide the reader with any "rest and relaxation" is a different matter altogether. For a start, its protagonist is difficult to love. Clearly highly intelligent and spot-on in her observations, she is also egoistical and egotistical, and her apparent disdain of society also extends to her only friend, whom she treats with an irritating sense of superiority (or is hers an inverted inferiority complex?) The vacuity of a year spent in hibernation, the images of soulless sex and materialistic, degraded art, sometimes rub off on the novel itself, which grows tiring at intervals.

And yet there's much to admire in this work, whether one opts to read it as an expression of millennial angst or a darkly comic critique of the contemporary art world or, indeed, of 21st Century Western society. The pleasure afforded by this novel is at times akin to the guilty, voyeuristic fascination some find in watching a car crash. But perhaps this is how it is meant to be.

https://endsoftheword.blogspot.com/2018/08/sleeping-beauty-my-year-of-rest-and.h... ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Sep 12, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ottessa Moshfeghprimary authorall editionscalculated
Baude, ClémentTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Biekmann, LidwienTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dahl, AlvaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guerzoni, GioiaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stheeman, TjadineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
If you're smart or rich or lucky
Maybe you'll beat the laws of man
But the inner laws of spirit
And the outer laws of nature
No man can
No, no man can . . .
"The Wolf that Lives in Lindsey," Joni Mitchell
Dedication
For Luke. My one. My only.
First words
Whenever I woke up, night or day, I'd shuffle through the bright marble foyer of my building and go up the block and around the corner where there was a bodega that never closed.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"From one of our boldest, most celebrated new literary voices, a shocking and tender novel about a young woman's efforts to sustain a state of deep hibernation over the course of a year on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Our narrator should be happy, shouldn't she? She's young, thin, pretty, a recent Columbia graduate, works an easy job at a hip art gallery, lives in an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan paid for, like the rest of her needs, by her inheritance. But there is a dark and vacuous hole in her heart, and it isn't just the loss of her parents, or the way her Wall Street boyfriend treats her, or her sadomasochistic relationship with her best friend, Reva. It's the year 2000 in a city aglitter with wealth and possibility; what could be so terribly wrong? My Year of Rest and Relaxation is a powerful answer to that question. Through the story of a year spent under the influence of a truly mad combination of drugs designed to heal our heroine from her alienation from this world, Moshfegh shows us how reasonable, even necessary, alienation can be. Both tender and blackly funny, merciless and compassionate, it is a showcase for the gifts of one of our major writers working at the height of her powers"--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.62)
0.5 1
1 11
1.5 5
2 30
2.5 4
3 65
3.5 23
4 127
4.5 11
5 58

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,722,303 books! | Top bar: Always visible