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Earth Abides by George R. Stewart
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Earth Abides (1949)

by George R. Stewart

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,498882,433 (3.96)1 / 244
  1. 70
    The day of the Triffids by John Wyndham (infiniteletters)
  2. 40
    The Stand by Stephen King (sturlington)
    sturlington: Stephen King has said that Earth Abides was an inspiration for The Stand.
  3. 20
    The Drowned World by J. G. Ballard (Bookmarque)
    Bookmarque: another post-apocalyptic book that takes a more introspective approach to the role of humans on the earth.
  4. 20
    No Blade of Grass by John Christopher (timspalding)
    timspalding: Another (and far better) classic post-apocalyptic story.
  5. 10
    The Slynx by Tatyana Tolstaya (agmlll)
  6. 10
    Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler (jlparent)
    jlparent: Main character witnesses/narrates the fall of civilization and its rebirth over a long time.
  7. 00
    Into the Forest by Jean Hegland (sturlington)
  8. 00
    The Scarlet Plague by Jack London (sturlington)
    sturlington: The Scarlet Plague is like an early version of Earth Abides.
  9. 12
    The Dog Stars by Peter Heller (IamAleem)
  10. 23
    World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks (timspalding)
  11. 01
    The World Without Us by Alan Weisman (Anonymous user)
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English (86)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (88)
Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
Starts out with a fairly ordinary guy and follows him through the end of the world via a disease that's wiped out most humans. The changes are incremental over the years, but by the end the society around him is vastly changed. He broods quite a bit about what isn't happening that he thinks should be, but day to day life overtakes ambition, as it does to everyone. I found the book unsettling and deeply moving, especially at the end. You spend most of the book inside this guy's head, and by the end he's old and his mind isn't what it used to be, and his regrets are plain, as is his acceptance. First rate story, ( )
  unclebob53703 | Apr 5, 2016 |
Only a few survivors are left after most of humanity suffers an apocalyptic fate. The societies the remaining humans create are fascinating, but what sticks in my mind to this day is the rapid loss of knowledge. When just surviving takes up all one's energy, each successive generation is taught less and less about the greater world. Only a few generations later, humanity has lost science, history, and literacy. To this day the book catches at my heart. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
This is a classic. Will civilization die with a whimper as the author suggests. He makes a convincing case. ( )
  jerry-book | Jan 26, 2016 |
I can see why this is considered a classic, although frustrating to read in parts. The protagonist returns from a long wilderness trip to find the world suddenly depopulated by an unspecified illness. The bulk of the book is the story of his life thereafter, first on his own, and then as the leader of a tiny and fragile colony. The book is frustrating because he is not the classic dominant hero, but a more bookish cerebral type, often without being able to carry the group with him through carisma. However, the writing is often insightful and even inspiring. ( )
  Matt_B | Jan 15, 2016 |
I had such high expectations for this book - yet another post-apocolyptic story. Isherwood is enjoying time alone in the mountains. When he ventures into town, he discovers that the world as he knew it is gone. From there Isherwood attempts to build a life in the new world, while maintaining the old ways. I found that the book jumped around a lot and that Mr. Steward didn't give enough description or detail for me to get a true sense of anything. Could be that was the writing style of the time but, when I was done with the book, I really didn't feel as though I had been a part of Isherwood's world (as I feel with most books I read). ( )
  sunnydrk | Dec 15, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stewart, George R.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Abbett, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bacon, C.W.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brunner, JohnForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davis, JonathanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Edwards, LesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fournier-Pargoire, JeanneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fowke, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gleeson, TonyCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lemos, GregorioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paolozzi, EduardoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sander, ErnstTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Willis, ConnieIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Men go and come, but earth abides ECCLESIASTES, I, 4
Dedication
To Jill
First words
. . . and the Government of the United States of America is herewith suspended, except in the District of Columbia, as of the emergency.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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Wikipedia in English (3)

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345487133, Paperback)

A disease of unparalleled destructive force has sprung up almost simultaneously in every corner of the globe, all but destroying the human race. One survivor, strangely immune to the effects of the epidemic, ventures forward to experience a world without man. What he ultimately discovers will prove far more astonishing than anything he'd either dreaded or hoped for.


From the Paperback edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:32 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

A disease of unparalleled destructive force has sprung up almost simultaneously in every corner of the globe, all but destroying the human race. One survivor, strangely immune to the effects of the epidemic, ventures forward to experience a world without man. What he ultimately discovers will prove far more astonishing than anything he'd either dreaded or hoped for.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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