HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Rage of Dragons (The Burning (1)) by…
Loading...

The Rage of Dragons (The Burning (1)) (original 2019; edition 2019)

by Evan Winter (Author)

Series: The Burning (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3301257,358 (4.18)6
The Omehi people have been fighting an unwinnable war for almost two hundred years. The lucky ones are born gifted. One in every two thousand women has the power to call down dragons. One in every hundred men is able to magically transform himself into a bigger, stronger, faster killing machine. Everyone else is fodder, destined to fight and die in the endless war. Young and gift-less, Tau Tafari wants more than this, but his plans of escape are destroyed when those closest to him are brutally murdered. With too few Gifted left, the Omehi are facing genocide, but Tau cares only for revenge. Following an unthinkable path, he will strive to become the greatest swordsman to ever live, a man willing to die a hundred thousand times, all for the chance to kill three of his own people.… (more)
Member:nakeshabrownreads
Title:The Rage of Dragons (The Burning (1))
Authors:Evan Winter (Author)
Info:Orbit (2019), 544 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Rage of Dragons by Evan Winter (2019)

Recently added byAltairia, private library, ShreyasDeshpande, margaretkwon, libraryhead, Autolykos

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Where we fight, the world burns!

Finally, a book involving dragons that isn't wack. This book is a must read and is right up there with Kings of Paradise and Priest of Bones. A coming of age and a tale of comeuppance that will break your heart as much as it uplifts your spirits. ( )
  ChaseBolling | Sep 8, 2020 |
This wasn't a bad book. The writing was fairly engaging and the worldbuilding was developed enough to maintain interest. I just do not care at all about military academy stories. Especially with a character who is just bent on Revenge. I'm just too frustrated with Tau's myopia to be interested in continuing this book.
  irasobrietate | Aug 31, 2020 |
Very fast paced story, pulls you along the whole way. Characters outside of the Tau feel a little flat and not well fleshed out. Tau can also come off a little that way but only because he's very single minded, more than his character feeling under developed. Very action and military/war focused, if you like to see characters training this very well might be your thing.

Good start to a series, will be happy to see where it goes and what else the author will do from here. ( )
  ProudPlatypus | Aug 16, 2020 |
This is the rare fantasy novel to be inspired by African culture. Its hero, Tau Solarin, is short in stature and not a fighter by nature. But cruel circumstances drive him to become the best warrior he can be. His people, the militaristic Omehi, have a fascinating caste system, history, and magic system. Even their units of measurement for time and formation size are cool little details.

The first half of the book is about Tau's development as a soldier, often with blow-by-blow descriptions of fights. I generally don't find martial minutiae very interesting, but the author writes it well, taking into account the force and angle of impact, as well as the combatants' fatigue, speed, agility, and sense of balance. It's the second half of the book, full of secrets that dramatically alter and enrich the story, that really blew me away.

I read the ebook while listening to the audiobook. Although this is a slow way to read, it helped me stay focused on the story and learn its vernacular. The narrator, Prentice Onayemi, has a soft intensity and is great at giving characters distinct personalities and accents.

I look forward to the sequel that's expected to come out in November. ( )
  KGLT | Jul 6, 2020 |
It's touted to be a mashup between The Game of Thrones and The Gladiator. And I agree. Though it's more of a Gladiator than The Game of Thrones. It doesn't have the depth of characters or the intrigue present in the Game of thrones. Also, don't be mislead by the title The Rage of Dragons and assume that dragons have a key role to play in it. Though dragons are central to the story, they are not given the agency that they deserve. They are simply used as props, at least in this book of the series. I am not sure if we'll see more of them in the forthcoming books of the series or not.

Synopsis
This is a story of Omehis, a race of gifted people, who escape their motherland and invade another land and spend the next 200 years fighting the native population of the invaded land. While the native Xiddians have numbers in their favor, the Omehis have their dragons. The Omehis also have a complicated hierarchy where the gifted and nobles are considered as higher class and the others (the non-gifted who outnumber the gifted) are considered as lessers.

Tau is one such lesser and he knows his fate is the same as the other lessers i.e. either become fodder for the fight with the Xiddians or live the life of a pitiful destitute. But, a terrible & unfortunate event destroys his best-laid plans and changes his course of life forever. Thirsting for an unquenchable vengeance, he becomes a mercenary and killer. Will he get his vengeance? Will he destroy himself in this quest for retribution or will he realize fate has bigger plans for him? forms the crux of the story.

Ruminations
This book started off really well but after the first trigger point of the story, it was a series of unending fights. The locations, motives, and people changed but the theme was the same. Fighting, fighting and more fighting.

If you are somebody who enjoys action scenes and fights, this book is for you. But, if you are looking for a story, character depth, or even some dragons, then you will be sorely disappointed. The dragons appear only to burn down everything, that's it. They are not characters in the story they are just mindless animals that are manipulated to destroy.

What appealed to me?
I loved the last part of the novel. Ironic, since I didn't care for almost 80% of the story. But, the ending clinched it for me. So much so that I am now eagerly looking forward to reading the next book in the series.

I liked Zuri's and Jayyed's characters. The only two sane people in the entire story. If I could even remotely care for any characters, it was these two. Tau was also great but my brain disconnected from him whenever he fought and since fighting is all he did in the entire book, I couldn't bring myself to care much for his character. He's an awesome protagonist though and his character development is one to look out for.

What didn't appeal to me?
For starters, from the beginning, the attitude of the Omehis left a very bitter taste in my mouth. The Omehis escape their motherland for some reason and invade this foreign land they call Xidda. They were the perpetrators, yet they claimed victimhood. The natives fought for their land and they kept fighting for 200 years and somehow it's the natives' fault and not the Omehis. This infuriated me.

Their arrogance, their sense of entitlement. It was all a bit too much and too close to home. Though it's a fictional story it reeked too much of colonization. The Omehi queen invaded a foreign land and what did she expect? For the natives to just keel over and die?

The following pertinent questions bothered me:
1. Why didn't the exiled queen beg or bargain for land instead of invading the foreign land and snatching it away from the natives? I could have understood if she had won the war and substantially brought the natives under her control. Instead, her hollow win ensured the continuation of an unnecessary war between the natives and the Omehis for 200 years. What sort of a Queen doesn't use diplomacy? This is a glaring flaw in the story in my opinion.

2. The story began with a dishonorable and detestable act. The natives who were called savages and heathens were driven off from their own land. Though I swallowed my distaste at the despicable victim card the Omehis played despite them being the perpetrators, I was hoping at some point this injustice and skewed morality will be handled in the course of the story. Nope, no such respite. The story didn't address the false victimhood of the Omehis nor did it give any scope for them to see the error in their ways. I can only hope this will be addressed in the next books in the series.

To conclude, you will enjoy this book if you like fighting, gore, and action. This story doesn't have any humor, joy or fun parts. It's action-packed, fast and dark. It is entertaining for the right audience and unfortunately, I am not one of them.

I wasn't impressed with the story, characters or even the underlying principles of this novel. But, I thoroughly enjoyed the ending, it gave me hope. Making a reader, who detested 80% of the story, to, in the end, root for that story is a talent worth mentioning. I am still surprised by how much I liked the last part of the book. I am now eagerly looking forward to the next book. I hope it will be better and the natives are treated better in it.

Initially, this was a two star read for me, but because I enjoyed the ending I bump it up to three stars.

Read my full review here: https://rrkreads.com/the-rage-of-dragons-adult-fantasy-fiction-book-review/

#bookreview #freebiegrade #3starreads #adultfantasy #evanwinter #therageofdragons ( )
  rrkreads | Jun 15, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Evan Winterprimary authorall editionscalculated
Stankovic, StefanCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my father for showing me how to work hard;
To my mother for her daily lessons in infinite love;
To my wife for being a better partner than any man deserves;
To my son, this story is for you.
First words
Queen Taifa stood at the bow of Targon, her beached warship, and looked out at the massacre on the sands.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The Omehi people have been fighting an unwinnable war for almost two hundred years. The lucky ones are born gifted. One in every two thousand women has the power to call down dragons. One in every hundred men is able to magically transform himself into a bigger, stronger, faster killing machine. Everyone else is fodder, destined to fight and die in the endless war. Young and gift-less, Tau Tafari wants more than this, but his plans of escape are destroyed when those closest to him are brutally murdered. With too few Gifted left, the Omehi are facing genocide, but Tau cares only for revenge. Following an unthinkable path, he will strive to become the greatest swordsman to ever live, a man willing to die a hundred thousand times, all for the chance to kill three of his own people.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.18)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 7
3.5 4
4 13
4.5 5
5 22

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,762,636 books! | Top bar: Always visible