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Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House…
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Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House (edition 2018)

by Michael Wolff (Author)

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1,8191306,757 (3.43)103
"The first nine months of Donald Trump's term were stormy, outrageous -- and absolutely mesmerizing. Now, thanks to his deep access to the West Wing, bestselling author Michael Wolff tells the riveting story of how Trump launched a tenure as volatile and fiery as the man himself. In this explosive book, Wolff provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office. Among the revelations : What President Trump's staff really thinks of him -- What inspired Trump to claim he was wire-tapped by President Obama -- Why FBI director James Comey was really fired -- Why chief strategist Steve Bannon and Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner couldn't be in the same room -- Who is really directing the Trump administration's strategy in the wake of Bannon's firing -- What the secret to communicating with Trump is -- What the Trump administration has in common with the movie The Producers. Never before has a presidency so divided the American people. Brilliantly reported and astoundingly fresh, Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury shows us how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion" -- Book jacket.… (more)
Member:strawberryplur
Title:Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House
Authors:Michael Wolff (Author)
Info:Henry Holt and Co. (2018), Edition: First Edition, 321 pages
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Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael WOLFF (Author)

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Showing 1-5 of 125 (next | show all)
Ugh. This is the most boring book I've heard in a long time, and it's questionably sourced. Somehow, Michael Wolff managed to turn salacious/tumultuous/chaotic stories of the first year of the Trump White House into some banal/boring stupidity. There really is nothing here: there was some conflict among some of the staff, but that's basically it. Maybe there will be an interesting book about the Trump Presidency in the future, but this book isn't it.

The audiobook is painful to listen to as well; I'd read the text instead. Ploddingly slow at 1x, and at 2x sounds breathless. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
It was okay.

The book is so obviously rushed to print. There's small typos everywhere. Sentences run-on, ramble, or contain nested asides (of differing amounts of relevance to the main idea), and chapter/paragraph organization is sloppy. (It'd drive my advisers to conniption.) There's small errors like the wrong year or a mis-spelling in a name that make the text look like the author didn't know what he was talking about, but given the nature of the error I think its more likely an artifact of its rushed and largely un-edited state.

Reading this book over 5 months, I'm inclined to believe it. Do I think the quotes are exact? No, not for a second, especially when Wolff most assuredly was likely getting many of them second- or third-hand (compounding the issues with the lack of transparency of sources). But the 'gist' of the narrative seems to check out - I don't know if it matters if Trump was called a 'fucking moron' versus the synonymous 'fucking idiot' when the rest of the context is accurate.

This book is a study on preaching to the converted and telling folks what they want to hear - Wolff knows his audience. While I appreciate how hard it trolled Trump, I didn't really gain any new knowledge from this book, or new insight on Trump's presidency. I already knew he was unintelligent, uninformed, and largely uneducated in any area relevant to the position. I already knew he was easily flustered and frustrated, easily charmed and manipulated, and easily confused. I already knew he has trouble controlling his temper, controlling his staff, and controlling his own attention. I already knew he was unorganized in his thought, speech, and policies.

That's the problem with this book. And The Case for Impeachment. And A Higher Loyalty. No matter how fast you rush a book out, its too late. Trump's already moved on to other mistakes, scams, and scandals. The modern media struggle to keep up with every political faux pas, obvious lies, and general un-Presidential behavior that a book has no chance. ( )
  kaitlynn_g | Dec 13, 2020 |
Interesting, horrifying, hilarious and mostly gossip. ( )
  LoisSusan | Dec 10, 2020 |
Well written and credible, although little in it is new - most has appeared in other print media, albeit not in on place at the same time. It perfectly describes a dysfunctional White House and its oily nepotism. ( )
  ichadwick | Dec 7, 2020 |
Jarvanka vs Bannon w/ Preibus in the middle
Review of the Henry Holt & Co. hardcover edition (January 2018)

Fire and Fury is currently (as of late November 2020) the 2nd most top voted book in the Trump Tell-alls List on Goodreads, which has the somewhat shocking current total of 225 books. The list is likely going to increase by 100+ with the Trump era ending and many retrospectives and memoirs yet to be written and published.

I found Fire and Fury to be a more realistic account of the initial months of the Trump presidency than Woodward's Fear, although it only covers about 6 to 9 months compared to the later book's 18 or so months. Wolff's style has less of the imagined quoted conversations than Woodward's which lent more of a fictional air to the latter book.

Wolff's focus is on the power play between the forces of strategist Steve Bannon and his Bannonites (representing the America First / Nationalist goals) vs advisors daughter Ivanka Trump & husband Jared Kushner and their allies (Jarvanka for short) and their more tempered approach (even Democrat conciliatory) but still fiercely family loyalty. The initial White House Chief of Staff Reince Preibus (representing the old school Republican Party) is caught in the middle. It is Shakespearean in its crazed gamesmanship towards the goals of power and influence. Surprisingly, Bannon actually comes across as the voice of reason several times, counselling against actions such as the firing of FBI Director James Comey.

I read Fire and Fury as part of my reading survey of various books in relation to the 2020 American Election. As a Canadian I’ve generally ignored American politics and elections in past years, but the drama of the situation in 2020 has heightened my interest. ( )
  alanteder | Nov 24, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 125 (next | show all)
Wolff is strongest when he’s writing on what he knows best: the insecurities and ambitions of Trump and other media fixtures. Yet while much of this presidency does revolve around news coverage, it is still a presidency. And Wolff is far weaker when it comes to politics.
 
Wolff’s access to Trump and his inner circle is evident. At the outset, Wolff writes of how he sat down with Trump in his Beverly Hills home, while Kushner and Trump aides Hope Hicks and Corey Lewandowski milled about. Likewise, the quotes obviously bespeak knowledge and close proximity.

Unlike Hillary Clinton, Trump represented a movement, and that fact deserved greater elucidation by Wolff. Said differently, among Fire and Fury’s shortcomings are its failure to adequately explain how Trump arrived at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, and its insufficient appreciation for the bond forged by Trump and his base. In that sense, the book lacks the connective tissue present in Devil’s Bargain, Joshua Green’s take on the Trump campaign and the first few months of the presidency.

Clearly, Fire and Fury has set off a storm that has left its share of casualties. ... Make no mistake, Wolff’s latest is a must-read. It pulls away whatever curtain still cloaks the Trump White House, leaving those who know Trump best to do the talking.
added by Cynfelyn | editThe Guardian, Lloyd Green (Jan 5, 2018)
 
Wolff inevitably likens the Russian cover-up to the skulduggery of Watergate, and briefly updates us on Pissgate and Pussygate – respectively the spurious tale of the golden shower in Moscow, and Trump’s better-authenticated braggadocio about his success as a groper (although, evidently believing that executive privilege protects his mendacity, he now claims that it “really wasn’t me” on that tape).

Fire and Fury also gives the lowdown on the lacquered trompe-l’oeil that is Trump’s hairdo, with those tinted tendrils combed over a cranium that is totally bald and resonantly empty. But beyond such acts of exposure, what makes the book significant is its sly, hilarious portrait of a hollow man, into the black hole of whose needy, greedy ego the whole world has virtually vanished. Wolff deplores Trump, explains the conditions that made him possible, and accuses us all of colluding in this madness.
added by SnootyBaronet | editThe Guardian, Peter Conrad
 
Fire and Fury is really two books rolled into one. The first is a compelling nonfiction book about the intellectual divide in the modern right, as candidly hashed out to Wolff by influential figures like Steve Bannon and Roger Ailes and (seemingly?) Rupert Murdoch.

The second is a Primary Colors-style novel about what goes on behind various closed doors in the Trump White House, based on a few bits and pieces of fact, which are offset by mountains of eye-rollingly insupportable supposition, spiced with occasional stretches of believable analysis.
added by SnootyBaronet | editRolling Stone, Matt Taibbi
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
WOLFF, MichaelAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Angerer, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barenberg, Richardsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bogdan, IsabelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chelley, IsabelleTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Copper, NikkiTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cruz, Marta NevesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ernst, JonathanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Faure, MichelTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Graham, HolterNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guerra, RitaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Levavi, Meryl SussmanDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pracher, RickCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schönherr, JanÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The evening began at six-thirty, but Steve Bannon, suddenly among the world's most powerful men and now less and less mindful of time constraints, was late.
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"The first nine months of Donald Trump's term were stormy, outrageous -- and absolutely mesmerizing. Now, thanks to his deep access to the West Wing, bestselling author Michael Wolff tells the riveting story of how Trump launched a tenure as volatile and fiery as the man himself. In this explosive book, Wolff provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office. Among the revelations : What President Trump's staff really thinks of him -- What inspired Trump to claim he was wire-tapped by President Obama -- Why FBI director James Comey was really fired -- Why chief strategist Steve Bannon and Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner couldn't be in the same room -- Who is really directing the Trump administration's strategy in the wake of Bannon's firing -- What the secret to communicating with Trump is -- What the Trump administration has in common with the movie The Producers. Never before has a presidency so divided the American people. Brilliantly reported and astoundingly fresh, Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury shows us how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion" -- Book jacket.

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