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The Consuming Fire (The Interdependency, #2)…
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The Consuming Fire (The Interdependency, #2) (edition 2018)

by Wil Wheaton

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5784029,431 (3.92)39
"The second, thrilling novel in the bestselling Interdependency series, from Hugo Award-winning author John Scalzi. The Interdependency, humanity's interstellar empire, is on the verge of collapse. The Flow, the extra-dimensional conduit that makes travel between the stars possible, is disappearing, leaving entire star systems stranded. When it goes, human civilization may go with it--unless desperate measures can be taken. Emperox Grayland II, the leader of the Interdependency, is ready to take those measures to help ensure the survival of billions. But nothing is ever that easy. Arrayed before her are those who believe the collapse of the Flow is a myth--or at the very least, an opportunity that can allow them to ascend to power. While Grayland prepares for disaster, others are preparing for a civil war, a war that will take place in the halls of power, the markets of business, and the altars of worship as much as it will take place between spaceships and battlefields. The Emperox and her allies are smart and resourceful, but so are her enemies. Nothing about this power struggle will be simple or easy... and all of humanity will be caught in its widening gyre" --… (more)
Member:walrii
Title:The Consuming Fire (The Interdependency, #2)
Authors:Wil Wheaton
Info:Audible Studios, Audible Audio, 8 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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The Consuming Fire by John Scalzi

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» See also 39 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Good book, as per usual, and I really like this series. The book was entirely too short though. ( )
  redkian | Aug 26, 2020 |
“The Flow was like a river that spaceships travelled between star systems, that could take the ships back and forth faster that if they travelled in normal space, where they could only go as fast as the speed of light. But while thew Flow was like a river - it was an extra-dimensional whatever-i-was that if you were ever exposed to it directly, you would just disappear. Ships travelling in the Flow had to make ab energy bubble that trapped a bit of space-time with them so they could still exist inside the Flow, and if the bubble popped, so did everything inside it.”



“’The internal topography of the Flow doesn’t precisely correspond to the space-time we’re familiar with. In fact, if we didn’t wrap our own ships inside a little bubble of space-time before they entered the Flow, they’d just cease to exist, at least in a way we understand as existing. I could explain it better but I would need more time, and I have another presentation to give across Hubfall in two and half hours’ [paraphrasing Lady Kiva: no shit Scalzi!!!]”



“This is because the Flow, while thought of as a river, or road, or another sort of linear bearer of transportation [I’ll add footpath...], was not actually remotely like any of those things, or remotely linear [Yep, we all get that Scalzi; the Flow is neither linear, nor a river; you’re repeating yourself...].”



“’If civilisation survives we might go down in history as the co-discoverers of the Claremont-Roynold Distributio [at this point I thought to myself: “at last we’ll have my Eganian moment and Scalzi will put some meat in the bones of the Theory...no such luck! It was not even bullshit make-believe physics! Scalzi does not even care...ROTFL].”



The quotes above is what I like to call “The Diorrhea of the (contemporary) SF industry”.

Reading this second installment after the first, it always seems Scalzi’s way is to hack out his stuff not fully formed like the Jelly-Os from his novel “Agent to the Stars”...his novels seem to come to him fully birthed as one long whoosh to the finish and then take out the first draft of the previous blast and, minimally polish it for market. Scalzi has not the greatest hack practice of any living SF writer, perhaps (when did he started hacking stuff I wonder?) At least he has held the belts a hell of a stretch, enough to be the King of SF today as an also ran who made it to the podium and sang successfully for decades, as the robotic presence of contemporary Shakespearean SF - in the most general sense of sheer multitudinal love by the bill, millions and millions who know his name and connect to his books. Even a small portion of his oeuvre is enough for most casual lay fiction readers who make up the 99% of readers who just want entertaining. I know Scalzi has been poo-poohed by most of the SF know-all literati for a while, and still is amongst the old grudges that live as long as the one holding them or it: many against the King of SF today who is Edgar Allen Poe who lived beyond into reality's success, for decade after decade. One word at a time, John might say is the way to write, when he is asked how do you, by the many, many interviewers asking for an in to know-how; and Scalzi makes them all roll to his drum. He is the one. I believe he may think hack is a badge of insult and pride. When we reach rock bottom as a writer; in whatever genre - we come to understand life as a game of writing and reciting in the war of both forms; silent and spoken we exist in the fictional realm first; Scalzi might say, as a character in what is perhaps, for many buffs, his defining pinnacle of Early Scalzi raw and cooked (e.g., “Agent to the Stars”, and “How I Proposed to My Wife - An Alien Sex Story”, etc.): when he was on a tray of bud, non-stop pot and, eventually, cocaine to fuel the writing binges where John flew first high as a master marskmen harnessing the wing of his inner John Scalzi we all have as a template with which to pretend. Pretending is what Scalzi does, has done and will do so until he drops, I bet; and if wrong it is not far off, because if Scalzi stopped now; the totting up of stats with this writer which will archive immediately on Scalzi’s exit-stage right to what realm beyond life he'll return to as soul. Scalzi of the instant reality within: the scenes he makes up are instantly real and there, wholly in medias res, Scalzi bestrides the page as Destiny itself; some inner note he crafts bespoke: to you and we who buy his tales. There is the legend that Scalzi, for a bet, wrote his first novel book, “Agent to the Stars”, for a bet that he would still sell undercover, as an unknown author; which he did; 10,000 copies; even though he tried to load the dice against it happening; as an artistic event lasting many ears until Scalzi revealed himself as the Author, officially. A genius of the first rate brigade and whose imagination reveals our own as the puny impostors we really are, next to John Scalzi.

This story might have been true in an Everettian sort of make-believe-universe…Scalzi has ideas by the bucket load. I just wish his stuff was better written…I know. Stupid of me…



NB: Explain to my why the Dalasyslans could be almost unintelligible to the guys from the Interdependency and all the characters in the novel spoke as if they came out of a 20th Century Soap Opera?? Even the vernacular is spot on!



SF = Speculative Fiction. ( )
  antao | Aug 16, 2020 |
More political shenanigans than I usually have patience for, but in this case the storytelling is so solid and witty, and the comeupances are so satisfying that even the political shenanigans are entertaining. (Even the *wormhole science* is entertaining.) ( )
  elenaj | Jul 31, 2020 |
This was quite enjoyable lots of snarky sweary characters and the ending has a good payoff. It’s pretty heavy on exposition but it’d be three times as long without it. ( )
  3j0hn | Jun 17, 2020 |
Some of the writing is truly awful, and the characters are paper-thin. Scalzi tries to make up for that with a light, winking tone, but that doesn't suffice. Finally, the whole story seems like bulked-up filler between book 1 and book 3 in the series. None of the plot is meaningful on its own, and all the major events are just to set up the sequel. ( )
  breic | Jun 14, 2020 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Scalziprimary authorall editionscalculated
SparthCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wheaton, WilNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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"The second, thrilling novel in the bestselling Interdependency series, from Hugo Award-winning author John Scalzi. The Interdependency, humanity's interstellar empire, is on the verge of collapse. The Flow, the extra-dimensional conduit that makes travel between the stars possible, is disappearing, leaving entire star systems stranded. When it goes, human civilization may go with it--unless desperate measures can be taken. Emperox Grayland II, the leader of the Interdependency, is ready to take those measures to help ensure the survival of billions. But nothing is ever that easy. Arrayed before her are those who believe the collapse of the Flow is a myth--or at the very least, an opportunity that can allow them to ascend to power. While Grayland prepares for disaster, others are preparing for a civil war, a war that will take place in the halls of power, the markets of business, and the altars of worship as much as it will take place between spaceships and battlefields. The Emperox and her allies are smart and resourceful, but so are her enemies. Nothing about this power struggle will be simple or easy... and all of humanity will be caught in its widening gyre" --

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