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More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon
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More Than Human (original 1953; edition 2007)

by Theodore Sturgeon

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1,848None3,736 (3.95)70
Member:batou
Title:More Than Human
Authors:Theodore Sturgeon
Info:Gollancz SFG Masterworks (2007), Edition: New Ed, Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon (1953)

1950s (7) 1953 (6) 20th century (14) Already read (6) American (11) classic (15) Easton Press (11) ethics (7) evolution (26) fantasy (21) fiction (172) gestalt (16) hardcover (7) mmpb (10) mutants (10) novel (43) own (8) paperback (13) read (26) science fiction (474) sf (144) SF Masterworks (27) sff (32) speculative fiction (16) Sturgeon (13) telepathy (15) theodore sturgeon (9) to-read (40) unread (21) wishlist (7)
  1. 00
    The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (rickybutler)
    rickybutler: Well, More Than Human is the sci-fi Sound+Fury, so get to it, fans!
  2. 00
    This Alien Shore by C. S. Friedman (MyriadBooks)
  3. 00
    The Sandman: Endless Nights by Neil Gaiman (MyriadBooks)
  4. 01
    Triggers by Robert J. Sawyer (ShelfMonkey)
  5. 02
    A Small and Remarkable Life by Nick DiChario (ShelfMonkey)
    ShelfMonkey: DiChario is the only writer I've found who echoes Theodore Sturgeon will still remaining vigorous and fresh.
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» See also 70 mentions

English (31)  Japanese (1)  French (1)  All languages (33)
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
Unforgettable. Read it while very young and re-read again and again. Seminal, important, brilliant work. Short though and I wished it was longer every time, but this book is a treasure to behold. Just look at the year of publication – how advanced was Sturgeon's thinking? A must-read and a must-keep. ( )
  aguba | Nov 11, 2013 |
stars

This is what I would call a psychological fiction. Worth reading. ( )
  crdf | Sep 15, 2013 |
This was okay but it jumped around too much for me. The "main" character kept changing and I was never sure who was who? I appreciate at least some of the statement he was trying to make now that I'm done reading it but while I was reading (listening actually) to it I was too preoccupied trying to figure out if a certain character was actually a different incarnation of another character or not. ( )
  ragwaine | Aug 26, 2013 |
This is a book that takes place mostly inside the head of one of the various characters, between which it switches back and forth so many times that there isn't really a "protagonist" per se. It's also a book in which all of the little action takes place in extended flashbacks, and the rest of the goings-on are related in dialogue. In other words, it's almost completely "tell" and not "show," by far the most of any novel I've ever read. . . which is to say that all in all it was pretty slow. . . one third of the story passes before it becomes remotely engaging.

It's also a book that revolves pretty heavily around Freud/Jung-era psychology and a vague relationship between various types of otherwise-unrelated telepaths. In other words, it was probably pretty groundbreaking in 1953 when it came out but now the ideas are merely interesting, and the pace unacceptably slow. I understand that (according to the jacket) this was "among the first to have launched sci-fi into the arena of literature," but I'm sorry to say that's not a redeeming enough quality for a 21st century reader.

I would read it if you're interested in the history of sci-fi and want to experience the benchmarks or milestones. It's also good to keep in mind that this was written around the same time as [b:The Foundation Trilogy|46654|The Foundation Trilogy (Foundation, #1-3)|Isaac Asimov|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1316412178s/46654.jpg|41350], and the very same year as [b:Fahrenheit 451|4381|Fahrenheit 451|Ray Bradbury|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1351643740s/4381.jpg|1272463], Clarke's [b:Childhood's End|414999|Childhood's End|Arthur C. Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1320552628s/414999.jpg|209414], and Bester's [b:The Demolished Man|76740|The Demolished Man|Alfred Bester|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1360171879s/76740.jpg|1247570]. This is the least entertaining of the bunch but probably has more literary worth than the Bester or Clarke, more like [a:Philip K. Dick|4764|Philip K. Dick|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1264613853p2/4764.jpg] in that respect. It also reminds me somewhat of David Lindsay's fascinating [b:A Voyage to Arcturus|1064084|A Voyage to Arcturus|David Lindsay|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1328819689s/1064084.jpg|923907] (written some 30 years before). ( )
  blake.rosser | Jul 28, 2013 |
When my friend Joe and I read this in 7th Grade we were thoroughly impressed, and still often mention scenes we recall.

Theodore Sturgeon's characters and story development are excellent. His plots are slightly weaker, but still very good. ( )
  GarryRogers | May 25, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Theodore Sturgeonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bacon, C.W.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pepper, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Viskupic, GaryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To His Gestaltitude Nicholas Samstag
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The idiot lived in a black and gray world, punctuated by the white lightning of hunger and the flickering of fear.
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The Fabulous Idiot - Baby is Three - Morality
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375703713, Paperback)

First published in 1953, this most celebrated of Sturgeon's works won the International Fantasy Award.

In this genre-bending novel, among the first to have launched science fiction into literature, a group of remarkable social outcasts band together for survival and discover that their combined powers render them superhuman. There's Lone, the simpleton who can hear other people's thoughts; Janie, who moves things without touching them; and the teleporting twins, who can travel ten feet or ten miles. There's Baby, who invented an antigravity engine while still in the cradle, and Gerry, who has everything it takes to run the world except for a conscience. Separately, they are talented freaks. Together, they may represent the next step in evolution -- or the final chapter in the history of the human race. As they struggle to find whether they are meant to help humanity or destroy it, Sturgeon explores questions of power and morality, individuality and belonging, with suspense, pathos, and a lyricism rarely seen in science fiction.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:52:39 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Lone, Janie, Baby, and Gerry, each possessed of an unusual talent, discover that together they are superhuman and must decide whether to use their powers for good or evil.

(summary from another edition)

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