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Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes
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Leviathan (1651)

by Thomas Hobbes

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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6,349341,060 (3.55)117
Leviathan is both a magnificent literary achievement and the greatest work of political philosophy in the English language. Permanently challenging, it has found new applications and new refutations in every generation. This new edition reproduces the first printed text, retaining the originalpunctuation but modernizing the spelling. It offers exceptionally thorough and useful annotation, an introduction that guides the reader through the complexities of Hobbes's arguments, and a substantial index.… (more)
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» See also 117 mentions

English (29)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (33)
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
Macpherson, C. B. (Editor)
  LOM-Lausanne | Apr 29, 2020 |
192 HOB
  alessandragg | Apr 22, 2020 |
Prev. publ. in the Penguin English library Orig. publ. 1651 ( )
  ME_Dictionary | Mar 19, 2020 |
La materia, forma y poder de un estado eclesiástico y civil
  LaBibliotecadeBabel | Mar 18, 2020 |
Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes is a perennial classic and a masterpiece of lucid thought. In this volume, Hobbes explores human nature to a natural conclusion, life is nasty, brutish, and short. The only way to alleviate man’s natural predilections is to have a powerful absolute monarchy.

This particular version that I own is the Oxford University Press edition. It contains in-depth information on Leviathan and the life and times that spawned it. Alongside the text are little asides that paraphrase what is being discussed.

The book proper is composed of four main sections; Of Man, Of Commonwealth, Of A Christian Commonwealth, and Of The Kingdom of Darkness. The book is similar to Spinoza’s Ethics in that it starts with basic premises and goes on to build from that. I suppose it would be more apt to say that it is similar to Euclid’s Elements. Each section is split into chapters. There really isn’t much else to say about it, other than that it uses the original text and it is somewhat annoying with how they phrase things. Also, the book was written before they invented spelling. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
*Malmesburyn ateisti suomeksi*

Liberaalin markkinatalousjärjestelmän syntyä ja olemusta koskevat pohdinnat ovat suomalaisessa keskustelussa viime aikoina lisääntyneet. Mikäli Englantia voidaan 1600-luvulta lähtien pitää modernin, porvarillisen Euroopan pioneerimaana suhteellisen joustavan sosiaalisen rakenteensa sekä poliittisen ja taloudellisen kehityksensä osalta, on englantilaisen poliittisen ajattelun klassikoiden suomentaminen erityisen ajankohtaista. Tuomo Ahon suomennos Thomas Hobbesin Leviathan-teoksesta on suuri kulttuuriteko vielä kolme ja puoli vuosisataa alkuteoksen ilmestymisen jälkeen jo siksi, että Hobbes ottaa kantaa ihmistä, ihmisyhteisöjä ja ylipäätään olemassaoloa koskeviin kysymyksiin tavalla, joka on yhtä ajankohtainen nykyihmiselle kuin se oli Hobbesin aikalaisille.
 

» Add other authors (66 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Thomas Hobbesprimary authorall editionscalculated
Curley, EdwinEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Macpherson, C. B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oakeshott, MichaelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Plamenatz, JohnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, W. G. PogsonEssaysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tuck, RichardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Nature (the ary whereby God hath made and governs the world) is by the art of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an artificial animal.
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He that is to govern a whole Nation, must read in himself, not this, or that particular man; but Man-kind: which though it be hard to do, harder than to learn any Language, or Science; yet when I shall have set down my own reading orderly, and perspicuously, the pains left another, will be onely to consider if he also find not the same in himself.
The names of such things as affect us, that is, which please, and displease us, because all men be not alike affected with the same thing, nor the same man at all times, are in the common discourses of men of inconstant signification. For seeing all names are imposed to signifie our conceptions; and all our affections are but conceptions; when we conceive the same things differently, we can hardly avoyd different naming of them. For though the nature of what we conceive, be the same; yet the diversity of our reception of it, in respect of different constitutions of body, and prejudices of opinion, gives everything a tincture of our different passions. And therefore in reasoning, a man must take heed of words; which besides the signification of what we imagine of their nature, have a signification also of the nature, disposition, and interest of the speaker; such as are the names of Vertues, and Vices; For one man calleth Wisdome, what another calleth feare; and one cruelty, what another justice; one prodigality, what another magnanimity; and one gravity, what another stupidity, &c. And therefore such names can never be true grounds of any ratiocination. No more can Metaphors, and Tropes of speech: but these are less dangerous, because they profess their inconstancy; which the other do not.

And those who do deceive upon hope of not being observed, do commonly deceive themselves, (the darknesse in which they lye hidden, being nothing else but there own blindnesse;) and are no wiser than Children, that think all hid, by hiding there own eyes.
Fear of oppression disposes a man to anticipate or to seek aid by society, for there is no other way by which a man can secure his life and liberty.
The office of the sovereign (be it a monarch or an assembly) consists in the end for which he was trusted with the sovereign power, namely the procuration of the safety pf the people. To which he is obliged by the law of nature and to render an account thereof to God...and to none but Him.
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