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The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
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The Dispossessed (1974)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Hainish Cycle (5), Hainish Cycle, Chronological (1)

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5,492114790 (4.14)1 / 298
Recently added bywademlee, rudidorn, Avedomni, nevahre, scroeser, CurrerBell, swensonj, private library, tleemans, Oakfairy
20th century (41) American (48) American literature (33) anarchism (146) anarchy (73) capitalism (36) dystopia (118) fantasy (93) fiction (620) hainish cycle (73) Hugo (33) Hugo Award (46) hugo winner (43) Le Guin (38) Nebula Award (41) nebula winner (40) novel (121) own (30) paperback (45) politics (61) read (89) science fiction (1,395) sf (289) SF Masterworks (39) sff (99) speculative fiction (60) to-read (119) unread (55) Ursula K. Le Guin (40) utopia (175)
  1. 41
    His Master's Voice by Stanisław Lem (TMrozewski)
    TMrozewski: Both deal with the social and cultural roots of science.
  2. 30
    The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin (Algybama)
  3. 20
    Always coming home by Ursula K. Le Guin (sturlington)
    sturlington: Compare and contrast.
  4. 20
    Worlds of Exile and Illusion by Ursula K. Le Guin (sturlington)
  5. 10
    Rocannon's world by Ursula K. Le Guin (andomck)
    andomck: Both are books in the Hainish Cycle.
  6. 10
    Doctor Mirabilis by James Blish (jpers36)
    jpers36: Life story of a genius physicist destined to revolutionize a stagnant culture with his radical scientific insights.
  7. 10
    Distress by Greg Egan (aulsmith)
    aulsmith: These books share isolated anarchist communities and discoveries in physics that change everything.
  8. 55
    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A. Heinlein (aulsmith)
    aulsmith: A different moon, a different anti-authoritarian community, but the same experience of thinking about other ways to run human societies
  9. 12
    The Necessary Beggar by Susan Palwick (MyriadBooks)
  10. 24
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (LamontCranston)
  11. 216
    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand (lauranav)
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English (110)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  Turkish (1)  All languages (114)
Showing 1-5 of 110 (next | show all)
Le Guin has explored the meaning of communism and anarchy and what being free really means in this novel. The people of Antarres, "Odonians", left their home planet of Urras about 200 years previously, and settled on the moon/sister planet to leave behind the evils of capitalism ("propertianism") and government oppression. Their society has no government, no ownership (even saying "my nose" is frowned upon -- "the nose" is preferred), no person or group in charge. However, the truth of those claims are tested when one Antarrian, Shevek, wishes to leave Antarres to go to Urras and pursue his physics research (which was not supported and even actively discouraged). Very thought-provoking. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 23, 2014 |
Political sci-fi at its best. Intelligent writing with no tired good-vs-evil. Thoughtful look at the strengths and weaknesses of capitalist and collectivist societies, and how human nature undermines (or softens) each 'pure' ideology.
  Clevermonkey | May 29, 2014 |
The Dispossessed is fascinating futuristic story of two societies, one a Utopian anarchist society the other a world similar to ours. The story follows Shevek as he becomes the first traveler to leave anarchist society and visit the other world.
The author, Usula Le Guin, is able to create and explain this fascinating anarchist society through the lives and actions of the characters in such an amazing way. It's a really interesting read. ( )
  ariahfine | Feb 6, 2014 |
Did not finish ( )
  rossarn | Feb 4, 2014 |
Geniuses does not fit into any society; and every society is dependent on them. ( )
  BruceCoulson | Jan 29, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 110 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (24 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ursula K. Le Guinprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ducak, DaniloCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ebel, AlexCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nyytäjä, KaleviTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pagetti, CarloForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roberts, AnthonyCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valla, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winkowski, FredCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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First words
There was a wall. It did not look important. It was built of uncut rocks roughly mortared. An adult could look right over it, and even a child could climb it. Where it crossed the roadway, instead of having a gate it degenerated into mere geometry, a line, an idea of boundary. But the idea was real. It was important. For seven generations there had been nothing in the world more important than that wall.
Quotations
You shall not go down twice to the same river, nor can you go home again. That he knew; indeed it was the basis of his view of the world. Yet from that acceptance of transience he evolved his vast theory, wherein what is most changeable is shown to be fullest of eternity, and your relationship to the river, and the river's relationship to you and to itself, turns out to be at once more complex and more reassuring than a mere lack of identity. You can go home again, the General Temporal Theory asserts, so long as you understand that home is a place where you have never been.
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The protagonist Shevek is a physicist attempting to develop a General Temporal Theory. Anarres is in theory a society without government or coercive authoritarian institutions. Yet in pursuing research that deviates from his society's current consensus understanding, Shevek begins to come up against very real obstacles. Shevek gradually develops an understanding that the revolution which brought his world into being is stagnating, and power structures are beginning to exist where there were none before. He therefore embarks on the risky journey to the original planet, Urras, seeking to open dialog between the worlds and to spread his theories freely outside of Anarres. The novel details his struggles on both Urras and his homeworld of Anarres.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061054887, Mass Market Paperback)

Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. he will seek answers, question the unquestionable, and attempt to tear down the walls of hatred that have isolated his planet of anarchists from the rest of the civilized universe. To do this dangerous task will mean giving up his family and possibly his life. Shevek must make the unprecedented journey to the utopian mother planet, Anarres, to challenge the complex structures of life and living, and ignite the fires of change.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:27:16 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Shevek, a brilliant physicist attempts to reunite two planets cut off from each other by centuries of distrust.

» see all 3 descriptions

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