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Qualcuno volò sul nido del cuculo by Ken…
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Qualcuno volò sul nido del cuculo (1962)

by Ken Kesey

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
15,869164111 (4.18)415
Member:ermita
Title:Qualcuno volò sul nido del cuculo
Authors:Ken Kesey
Info:
Collections:Finiti, Read but unowned
Rating:****
Tags:narrativa, USA

Work details

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (1962)

1960s (1)
  1. 70
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey may be paired with A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess or The Outsider by Albert Camus. All three novels explore the them of society versus the individual.
  2. 60
    Screw, a guard's view of Bridgewater State Hospital by Tom Ryan (fundevogel)
    fundevogel: A first hand account of the physical and psychological abuse of inmates at the Bridgewater Prison Hospital.
  3. 50
    Asylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates by Erving Goffman (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: When reading One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest there were two books that immediately sprung to mind, both non-fiction and the latter of which I'll post above. I think anyone captivated by the relations in this book, particularly the way in which the inmates are made to perceive themselves will get a huge amount from this book. It's wonderful, and Goffman has a very lucid, accessible way of writing, which certainly helps.… (more)
  4. 40
    Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason by Michel Foucault (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: Furthering on my Goffman recommendation, Foucault here details what he sees as being the movement from "treatment" of the mentally ill through more violent means through to what is described in Kesey's book as "infinitely more human methods". What is shown through Foucault's work is that whilst leaving no physical marks, turning man against man and reducing one's sense of self can be seen as even worse.… (more)
  5. 41
    The man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales by Oliver Sacks (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey may be paired with The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat by Oliver Sacks or even Awakenings by the same author. All three books explore the idea that once a person becomes ill or is institutionalised, they lose their rights and privileges.… (more)
  6. 30
    Junky by William S. Burroughs (melancholy)
  7. 30
    Cool Hand Luke: A Novel by Donn Pearce (slickdpdx)
  8. 20
    Little Big Man by Thomas Berger (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Delusional/Enlightened Outcast protagonists
  9. 20
    Blindness by José Saramago (st_bruno)
    st_bruno: per alienazione negli ospedali psichiatrici. Condizione umana
  10. 22
    The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Delusional/Enlightened Outcast protagonists
  11. 11
    Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy (AriadneAranea)
    AriadneAranea: Another chilling account of life in a US mental hospital - with a science fiction twist and a feminist angle.
  12. 11
    A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Delusional/Enlightened Outcast protagonists
  13. 111
    The Shawshank Redemption [videorecording] by Frank Darabont (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest can be paired with Frank Darabont's film The Shawshank Redemption based on Stephen King's short storyRita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. Could also be paired with Dead Poet's society as well.
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English (159)  Portuguese (1)  German (1)  Hebrew (1)  Dutch (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (164)
Showing 1-5 of 159 (next | show all)
(19) I don't know. This felt a bit dated to me. This is perhaps considered a 'modern' classic with a lot of goings on that have reached into pop culture and consciousness. I think everyone is familiar with Nurse Ratched, the Jack Nicholson character, and lobotomies from this novel and the movie it inspired. (which I have never seen) But it was really all fairly tame and anticlimactic in my opinion. It was actually a bit of a slog for me truth be told.

The story is told through the eyes of an Indian man who is a self-imposed mute who spends his days mopping the floors. Everyone assumes he is deaf, dumb, perhaps mentally handicapped. It seems he may be at least in the beginning somewhat catatonic as he speaks about the "fog" that comes over him. But he is effectively cured of his psychiatric illness in the course of getting to know the ward's newest arrival, McMurphy - a rebellious, seemingly light-hearted individual that tries to shake things up and get the best of the iron fisted nurse that runs rough shod over the unit. There is some drama at the end that brings the story arc to a close but it seems to all happen too quick while the build-up seemed terribly slow. Maybe that was intentional, but it didn't quite work for me.

I don't know. I felt like I, too, had taken a Seconal whenever I started in on this book in the evenings. It certainly doesn't ring true to any of the modern day psychiatric units I have ever seen in action. just OK for me. ( )
1 vote jhowell | Jul 8, 2014 |
The only thing I knew about this book was that Jack Nicholson was in the movie--if that's not enough reason to read a book, I'm not sure what is. Naturally, I thought the book was about him, and in a way it was. Imagine my surprise, though, when after reading the first page, I find out it's being told through the eyes of a patient in the mental hospital. I don't know why this surprised me so much, but it did.

I thought McMurphy was a great character. This is the story of his battle against Big Nurse. And I was deeply drawn in, right until the end. After reading the ending, I'm not sure of who I believe one, but I lean toward McMurphy.

If you haven't read it, I would say that needs to change! ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
The only thing I knew about this book was that Jack Nicholson was in the movie--if that's not enough reason to read a book, I'm not sure what is. Naturally, I thought the book was about him, and in a way it was. Imagine my surprise, though, when after reading the first page, I find out it's being told through the eyes of a patient in the mental hospital. I don't know why this surprised me so much, but it did.

I thought McMurphy was a great character. This is the story of his battle against Big Nurse. And I was deeply drawn in, right until the end. After reading the ending, I'm not sure of who I believe one, but I lean toward McMurphy.

If you haven't read it, I would say that needs to change! ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Who is insane? The patients of the mental ward run by Nurse Ratched; at least they are supposed to be, otherwise, why would they be in a mental hospital? Chief Bromden, a patient who pretends to be mute and deaf so he can listen to everything that happens, narrates the tale. He reports on the events as a new patient, McMurphy, comes on the ward and disrupts the orderly way things happen every day. He gambles and gets the men to vote, he sneaks people onto the ward and gets the men to think about their rights and how to buck the system. He tries to get the men to question who is really in charge: is it the doctor? Nurse Ratched? Or the men themselves? This book is an interesting look at a psychiatric hospital in the 1960s; much has changed, but maybe some things have remained the same. They no longer use eletroshock therapy, but the question of who is really in charge still remains. The book is a look into what insanity is, in the past and the present. Insanity can have many different faces. It makes me think of this idea: The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. ( )
  litgirl29 | Jun 27, 2014 |
It took me longer than I expected but I finally finish this book. The first part took me a long time to read and i was not getting into it. But after that I couldn't stop. The book absorb me and the characters so well describe in the beginning started to take action. Is a great reading and a most - do. It shows you a place were the doctors rule and patients are lab rats. Is a lesson in life a lesson that no matter where you are you have to keep your spirit run free and smile, never forget the power of a free smiling spirit, even when you feel like a bird in a cage. ( )
  CaroPi | May 6, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 159 (next | show all)
The world of this brilliant first novel is Inside—inside a mental hospital and inside the blocked minds of its inmates. Sordid sights and sounds abound, but Novelist Kesey has not descended to mere shock treatment or isolation-ward documentary. His book is a strong, warm story about the nature of human good and evil, despite its macabre setting.
added by Shortride | editTime (Feb 16, 1962)
 
What Mr. Kesey has done in his unusual novel is to transform the plight of a ward of inmates in a mental institution into a glittering parable of good and evil.
 

» Add other authors (24 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ken Keseyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Palahniuk, ChuckForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
. . . one flew east, one flew west, One flew over the cuckoo's nest. - Children's folk rhyme
Dedication
To Vik Lovell who told me dragons did not exist, then led me to their lairs.
First words
"They're out there. Black boys in white suits up before me to commit sex acts in the hall and get it mopped up before I can catch them."
They're out there.
Quotations
It's the truth, even if it didn't happen.
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Book description
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1962) is a novel written by Ken Kesey. It is set in an Oregon asylum, and serves as a study of the institutional process and the human mind.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0451163966, Mass Market Paperback)

An international bestseller and the basis for a hugely successful film, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest was one of the defining works of the 1960s.

A mordant, wickedly subversive parable set in a mental ward, the novel chronicles the head-on collision between its hell-raising, life-affirming hero Randle Patrick McMurphy and the totalitarian rule of Big Nurse. McMurphy swaggers into the mental ward like a blast of fresh air and turns the place upside down, starting a gambling operation, smuggling in wine and women, and egging on the other patients to join him in open rebellion. But McMurphy's revolution against Big Nurse and everything she stands for quickly turns from sport to a fierce power struggle with shattering results.

With One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Kesey created a work without precedent in American literature, a novel at once comic and tragic that probes the nature of madness and sanity, authority and vitality. Greeted by unanimous acclaim when it was first published, the book has become and enduring favorite of readers.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:53:44 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

An inmate of a mental institution tries to find the freedom and independence denied him in the outside world.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 18 descriptions

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Four editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141187883, 0141024879, 0143105027, 0141037490

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Two editions of this book were published by HighBridge.

Editions: 1598870521, 1598875108

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