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Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine…
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Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings (edition 2006)

by Deborah Hopkinson, Terry Widener (Illustrator)

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1048116,035 (3.56)2
abruser's review
This is the retelling of the story of the famous baseball player Alta Weiss who pitch for a semi-pro baseball team in 1907. Although it is fiction, the reader learns about Alta Weiss struggles as a female athlete. It would be a good book to use for a history lesson in famous women, and women who have achieved greatness against all odds. ( )
  abruser | Apr 26, 2012 |
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Summary:
About a girl who has a great arm and loves to play baseball even though it is very unusual for a girl to play. She shows how even girls can be good at sports.
Instructional Use:
This book will be a fun to read to students as a true story example of how women were treated differently before women were given equal rights. ( )
  mrspriest | Jul 1, 2014 |
Genre: Historical Fiction
Audience: 3-5th grade
This is a story about a young girl who aspires to be a baseball player at a time when girls were not encouraged to play sports. I will definitely use this book to show how women entered the world of sports. ( )
  ShantiR | Feb 27, 2014 |
Highlights women in baseball. But more importantly, highlights that women can do anything with a little practice and determination.
  JudesThree | Feb 24, 2013 |
This is the retelling of the story of the famous baseball player Alta Weiss who pitch for a semi-pro baseball team in 1907. Although it is fiction, the reader learns about Alta Weiss struggles as a female athlete. It would be a good book to use for a history lesson in famous women, and women who have achieved greatness against all odds. ( )
  abruser | Apr 26, 2012 |
Alta Weiss threw her first pitch at the age of two, when she hurled a corn cob at a tomcat chasing her favorite chicken. Later, she trained all year, even throwing practice pitches in the barn in the dead of winter, while the cows stood by and watched. Later, she became the first woman to play semi-pro baseball when she convinced the coach of the Ohio Independents to give her a try. In Deborah Hopkinson’s retelling of the true story in “Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings” readers get to know what it was like to be a woman at the turn of the century trying to break into a male-dominated industry. The plot is a bit bland, as so many “true stories” tend to be when they stay close to home, but Hopkinson makes up for it in beautiful imagery and metaphor, “…the glove on my hand as big as one of Mama’s prize sunflowers.” p. 4). Illustrator Terry Widener’s acrylic paint drawings are reminiscent of some of Picasso’s later work, with rounded lines and figures with piece-meal facial features, giving the book’s imagery a strong base. The book’s introduction includes suggestions for more reading on Alta Weiss and a website readers can check out and at the back, a timeline is included that details dates of other famous women in semi-pro and minor league baseball. Recommended for readers ages 6-10. ( )
  sroslund | Nov 26, 2011 |
This book did not receive any awards. Girl Wonder is good for preschoolers through 2nd grade because the book has a basic storyline for preschoolers to follow, but the idea of girls participating in sports is good for the 2nd graders and older grades. This story is about a little girl was born to play baseball, but she was born in the time when sports were only for men. Despite everyone telling her to stop playing she played with the boys and she practiced pitching when ever she found time. When she was 17 everyone told her to give up this dream of hers, but she went right to the manager of a baseball league and told them to let her play. At first he didn't want to because he didn't think girls can play ball, but then she said that people would come to the games more to see her play. So he signed her contract and the "girl wonder" became a celebrity and brought her team a championship. She eventually ended her career and became a doctor. This story deals with gender equality, diversity and following your dreams. Before reading I would see how many students play sports and how many girls play sports. Then I would have them say what activities are meant for boys and which are meant for boys. I would then bring out my college basketball jersey and read to the children in my jersey so it is showing that girls can not only play sports, but they can play it at a high level. After reading the book the younger grades can draw a picture of their favorite sport while the older grades can find articles in the news paper about women athletes and we can talk about gender equality.
  mmaher8 | Nov 5, 2011 |
This biographical picture book tells the story of Alta Weiss a pioneering female baseball player that convinces a coach to let her play and pitch for a semipro all male team the Vermilion Independents and becomes a celebrity. ( )
  ekean06 | Nov 11, 2009 |
This story is an excellent example of historical fiction because it tells the true story of baseball pioneer Alta Weiss in a fun and clever way, from the perspective of Alta herself. Weiss really was an outstanding baseball player that went on to play for the Vermilion Independents, an Ohio semipro team, in 1907. She later went on to medical school and was the only woman in her class. This story of Alta Weiss takes place in the early 1900's, which is important because it was the time when the Feminist Movement was just getting its start in the United States. Alta Weiss is an example of a woman who was willing to break the gender stereotypes of her time for the sake of following her dreams, and she is an inspiration to anyone who reads this story about her life.
  katitefft | Feb 25, 2009 |
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