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The World Without Us by Alan Weisman
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The World Without Us

by Alan Weisman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 236 mentions

English (157)  Italian (3)  German (2)  Danish (1)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  All languages (165)
Showing 1-5 of 157 (next | show all)
Zu viele Informationen, zu viel Daten, ein zu unscharfes und unwirkliches Szenario, das unstrukturiert von verschiedenen Ecken und Enden aus beleuchtet wird. Schwierig, auch nur einen Teil der Unfassbarkeit, die das Buch beschreibt, aufzunehmen.
Aber sicherlcih ein interressantes Szenario, wenngleich auch höchst unwahrscheinlich.
  Kindlegohome | Nov 22, 2018 |
A study of all the myriad ways the earth would be affected if humans up and disappeared all at once. I have a bit of a fascination with urban decay, so learning about what would happen to our infrastructure without upkeep was really cool. Unfortunately, the author gave the distinct impression that the world would be better off without people, which was kind of tiresome. I'm all for reducing one's footprint, but it was strongly implied that humans are interlopers on our home planet. All that aside, the bits about history and technology were pretty cool. Just don't expect a tale of hope and human ingenuity. ( )
  melydia | Oct 7, 2018 |
I got this book on CD from the library because I had watched the History Channel special based on this book and enjoyed it. I expected the book to be similar to the TV program--a look into what the world would be like if humans suddenly disappeared. The book does cover this, but mostly it discusses how humans are currently ruining the planet and that the world would be better off without us. That may be true, but it's depressing to listen to for 12 hours! ( )
  bookhookgeek | Sep 7, 2018 |
I found this book fascinating. The author looked into many different parts of human civilization to see what would be going on if humans disappeared. Cities, subways, ancient ruins, nuclear power plants, coral reefs, Panama Canal... The list goes on and on. By looking at what could happen, I learned a lot about what has already happened. ( )
  shelbycassie | Aug 5, 2018 |
I love books that teach me stuff, but I really love books that make me think! This is a fascinating look at what would happen to our world if human being all disappeared at the same time. What would happen to our homes, subways, pets, the ocean, the nuclear waste sites, etc! To figure out what would happen in the future the author has to briefly take us back to the past; and he does so in an accessible and entertaining way. ( )
  Rdra1962 | Aug 1, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 157 (next | show all)
That said, the science and factual stuff is, almost invariably, mind-boggling. I did not know, for instance, that ships the length of three football pitches entering the locks of the Panama Canal have only two feet of clearance on each side; that there may well be at least one billion annual bird deaths from flying into glass in the United States alone; or that graphic designers have been called in to imagine what warnings against coming too close to nuclear waste containers will be comprehensible 10,000 or more years from now.
 

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Weisman, Alanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lempinen, UllaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ohinmaa, TiinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
In memory of Sonia Marguerite with lasting love from a world without you
First words
One June morning in 2004, Ana Maria Santi sat against a post beneath a large palm-thatched canopy, frowning as she watched a gathering of her people in Mazaraka, their hamlet on the Rio Conambu, an Ecuadoran tributary of the upper Amazon.
Quotations
Quoting Les Knight " The last humans could enjoy their final sunsets peacefully, knowing they have returned the planet as close as possible to the Garden of Eden"

" He now fears that the planet is suffering a high fever, and that we are the virus."
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312347294, Hardcover)

A penetrating, page-turning tour of a post-human Earth
 
In The World Without Us, Alan Weisman offers an utterly original approach to questions of humanity's impact on the planet: he asks us to envision our Earth, without us.
In this far-reaching narrative, Weisman explains how our massive infrastructure would collapse and finally vanish without human presence; which everyday items may become immortalized as fossils; how copper pipes and wiring would be crushed into mere seams of reddish rock; why some of our earliest buildings might be the last architecture left; and how plastic, bronze sculpture, radio waves, and some man-made molecules may be our most lasting gifts to the universe.
The World Without Us reveals how, just days after humans disappear, floods in New York's subways would start eroding the city's foundations, and how, as the world's cities crumble, asphalt jungles would give way to real ones. It describes the distinct ways that organic and chemically treated farms would revert to wild, how billions more birds would flourish, and how cockroaches in unheated cities would perish without us. Drawing on the expertise of engineers, atmospheric scientists, art conservators, zoologists, oil refiners, marine biologists, astrophysicists, religious leaders from rabbis to the Dali Lama, and paleontologists---who describe a prehuman world inhabited by megafauna like giant sloths that stood taller than mammoths---Weisman illustrates what the planet might be like today, if not for us.
From places already devoid of humans (a last fragment of primeval European forest; the Korean DMZ; Chernobyl), Weisman reveals Earth's tremendous capacity for self-healing. As he shows which human devastations are indelible, and which examples of our highest art and culture would endure longest, Weisman's narrative ultimately drives toward a radical but persuasive solution that needn't depend on our demise. It is narrative nonfiction at its finest, and in posing an irresistible concept with both gravity and a highly readable touch, it looks deeply at our effects on the planet in a way that no other book has.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:31 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Journalist Weisman offers an original approach to questions of humanity's impact on the planet. Drawing on the expertise of engineers, atmospheric scientists, art conservators, zoologists, oil refiners, marine biologists, astrophysicists, religious leaders, and paleontologists, he illustrates what the planet might be like today if humans disappeared. He explains how our massive infrastructure would collapse and finally vanish without human presence; which everyday items may become immortalized as fossils; how copper pipes and wiring would be crushed into mere seams of reddish rock; why some of our earliest buildings might be the last architecture left; and how plastic, bronze sculpture, radio waves, and some man-made molecules may be our most lasting gifts to the universe. As he shows which human devastations are indelible, and which examples of our highest art and culture would endure longest, Weisman's narrative ultimately drives toward a radical but persuasive solution that needn't depend on our demise.--From publisher description.… (more)

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