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Tea with Jane Austen by Kim Wilson
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Tea with Jane Austen

by Kim Wilson

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
I cajoled my boyfriend to present me with this, and I reward him accordingly. ( )
  Filzero | Nov 27, 2015 |
I cajoled my boyfriend to present me with this, and I reward him accordingly. ( )
  Filzero | Nov 27, 2015 |
I cajoled my boyfriend to present me with this, and I reward him accordingly. ( )
  Filzero | Nov 27, 2015 |
I expected this book to be rather light and cute. Instead, I found it thoroughly readable and a terrific resource (I'm researching a novel set in this period). Recipes are included and, more importantly, put into context -- figuring out *when* the Regency English ate and drank can be trickier than *what*, since this aspect of the culture was in a state of flux. Frequent references are also made to contemporary works of fiction and nonfiction. I learned about several novels I'd never heard of.

Highly recommended for anyone who wants to learn more about Georgian England. ( )
  Deborah_Markus | Aug 8, 2015 |
In Regency era England, the popularity and social importance of tea-drinking is exemplified by Jane Austen’s characters no less than fifty-eight times in her six major novels. The observant reader will recognize pivotal events transpire around sitting down and taking tea: In Emma, Miss Bates declines coffee “No coffee, I thank you, for me-never take coffee. A little tea if you please,” in Northanger Abbey impressionable Catherine Moreland drinks tea with the Tilney’s and is awed by the “elegance of the breakfast set,” and in Pride and Prejudice, the toady Mr. Collins boasts of the supreme honor that his esteemed patroness Lady Catherine de Bourgh has bestowed on Elizabeth Bennet in being asked to tea at her grand residence of Rosings Park. We also know from Jane Austen’s letters that she was a tea-lover too. “We began our China Tea three days ago, & I find it very good.” Jane Austen, in a letter to her sister, Cassandra, 31 May 1811

Popularized in the early 1700’s by Charles II’s wife Queen Catherine, a century later tea drinking had become a passionate ritual for the gentry and aristocracy in England. Tea at any meal was de rigueur, in fact, a whole meal was named after it. Tea-time is traditionally a light late afternoon meal about 4:00 pm created to tide one over until supper, which in Town, could be very late into the evening. Tea with Jane Austen primarily delves into the social history of tea and its role in Jane Austen’s life and her writing. It also offers a delectable array of recipes listed with traditional Regency era ingredients and preparation along with a conversion for the modern cook. Readers may find, like me, that with so much talk of food that one wants to dash out to the kitchen and commence to make the perfect cup of tea as described on page 114, and throw oneself into baking the plum cake from page 31. Ha!

What I found most enjoyable about this slim volume was the frequent mention of events in Austen’s life or incidents by her characters in the novels that illustrate the importance of tea as a very British ritual. Quotes are used liberally throughout adding to the connection.

“Perhaps you should like some tea, as soon as it can be got.” They both declared that they should prefer it to anything. Mrs. Price to Fanny and William in Mansfield Park.

Broken down into interesting chapters: Tea in the Morning; Tea Shopping; Tea Away from Home; Tea and Health and Tea in the Evening, this book is packed with historical information conveniently indexed in the back and features a select bibliography for further reading. The friendly conversational style of the author is as welcome and soothing as her topic.

Laurel Ann, Austenprose ( )
  Austenprose | May 19, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 097212179X, Hardcover)

 "You must drink tea with us tonight."  —Sense & Sensibility

Who would not want to sit down with Jane Austen and join her in a cup of tea? Here for the first time is a book that shares the secrets of one of her favorite rituals. Tea figures prominently in Jane Austen's life and work. In fact, the beloved novelist was the keeper and maker of tea in her family. Tea with Jane Austen begins with tea drinking in the morning and ends with tea in the evening, at balls and other gatherings.

Each chapter includes a description of how tea was taken at a particular place or time of day, along with history, recipes, excerpts from Austen's novels and letters and illustrations from the time. The book also reveals how to make a perfect cup of tea!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:06 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

While to us tea is an everyday commodity, in Austen's time it was relatively expensive, and to be able to offer it to visitors implied some degree of social status. This book examines the social customs of the time, and includes recipes.

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