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Notes on Nursing: What It Is, and What It Is Not (1860)

by Florence Nightingale

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263475,081 (3.98)12
Outspoken writings by the founder of modern nursing record fundamentals in the needs of the sick that must be provided in all nursing. Covers such timeless topics as ventilation, noise, food, bed and bedding, light, cleanliness, and observation of the sick. "Still the finest book on nursing." -- Co-Evolution Quarterly.… (more)

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Showing 4 of 4
Interestingly written, deceptively impersonal, Nightingale's book not only takes on the prevailing "wisdom" about care for the sick, but gives advice that is extremely pertinent today. Open those windows! ( )
  lisahistory | Jul 12, 2020 |
The 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale's birth was celebrated on May 12, 2020. She was an amazing woman deserving of all the praise given. Among her advice for standard nursing care concerned with cleanliness and fresh air, are some interesting nuggets, such as: "Always sit within the patient's view, so that when you speak he has not to turn his head round in order to look at you." While most notes are common sense today, the Victorian sickroom was usually dark, stuffy, and fetid. Thankfully, our homes and hospitals are more hygienic than those of Nightingale's time and the swish of crinolines rarely keep a patient awake nowadays. It's an interesting look back at nursing and how it evolved especially when it is front page news at present. ( )
  VivienneR | May 14, 2020 |
Interesting to read to what has changed and what has not since Ms. Florence practiced nursing. She was a brave woman who was not afraid to share her knowledge. I wish I could have met her. ( )
  godmotherx5 | Apr 5, 2018 |
exact facsimile except cover? great wisdom and advice ( )
  Mikenielson | Feb 5, 2015 |
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The following notes are by no means intended as a rule of thought by which nurses can teach themselves to nurse, still less as a manual to teach nurses to nurse. They are meant simply to give hints for thought to women who have personal charge of the health of others. Every woman, or at least almost every woman, in England has, at one time or another of her life, charge of the personal health of somebody, whether child or invalid,—in other words, every woman is a nurse. Every day sanitary knowledge, or the knowledge of nursing, or in other words, of how to put the constitution in such a state as that it will have no disease, or that it can recover from disease, takes a higher place. It is recognized as the knowledge which every one ought to have—distinct from medical knowledge, which only a profession can have.
Shall we begin by taking it as a general principle—that all disease, at some period or other of its course, is more or less a reparative process, not necessarily accompanied with suffering: an effort of nature to remedy a process of poisoning or of decay, which has taken place weeks, months, sometimes years beforehand, unnoticed, the termination of the disease being then, while the antecedent process was going on, determined?
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Outspoken writings by the founder of modern nursing record fundamentals in the needs of the sick that must be provided in all nursing. Covers such timeless topics as ventilation, noise, food, bed and bedding, light, cleanliness, and observation of the sick. "Still the finest book on nursing." -- Co-Evolution Quarterly.

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