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The Trial by Franz Kafka
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The Trial (original 1925; edition 1995)

by Franz Kafka

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13,126139171 (4.02)459
Member:HydrogenGuy
Title:The Trial
Authors:Franz Kafka
Info:Schocken (1995), Edition: Definitive, Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fiction, post-modern, surrealism, you are number 6

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The Trial by Franz Kafka (1925)

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English (114)  Dutch (6)  Italian (5)  Spanish (3)  German (2)  French (2)  Danish (2)  Norwegian (1)  Finnish (1)  Swedish (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (139)
Showing 1-5 of 114 (next | show all)
Sparsely written, mostly just plot and dialogue, very little description, but still well-written. Tale in an unspecified city in an unspecified country, takes on a surreal tone; dare I say Kafkaesque? ( )
  charlie68 | Aug 24, 2015 |
Kafka's terrifying masterpiece that perfectly sums up the feeling of being in court. Although unfinished, The Trial has enough in it to let you know that it is a one-of-a-kind book of the first order. A somewhat similar book to this, Darkness At Noon, was published but it honestly doesn't come close to matching this book which is not allegory, not satire, not speculative. It just is. Perhaps there is no sadism greater than the mental torture of a trial in which you don't know what you're being charged with, where anything you say could further indict you, where you don't know how long the trial will last, and you don't know the extent to which the people of which you are in the power will use their authority. In truth this novel is also the ultimate expression of the legally-sanctioned sadomasochism in which people participate willingly. To believe something like this couldn't happen here is pure naivete, especially in the face of the fact that it does happen each and every day. It's perhaps the most slashing and visceral portrait of a system rotten to the core ever committed to paper. The lacuna (a skip from one of the book's chapters to the very end) evokes perhaps the greatest known literary loss of the 20th century. Savage to no known bounds, The Trial is absolutely one of the pinnacle examples of the 20th century novel. ( )
  Salmondaze | Jul 1, 2015 |
The Trial is a compelling read, but also so fucking frustrating. Questions are never answered and your left scream WHY???? K wakes up to find out he is being arrested, he is never told why, he is free to go about his daily life as long as when he is summoned to the court he comes. He tries to dismiss the trial as nothing more than a shady court system trying to get a bribe out of him. More people learn of his trial and he begins to take it more serious. K explores options and meets other people on trial. The ending will mess you up.

So what is the point of The Trial? There are lots of meanings that can be placed to what is read. Bureaucracy bullshit, a variety of metaphors the trial represents, or simply nothing but the text that is provided. Either way its a great short read that is interesting til the end. I didn’t know how I felt at the ending, was just kind of lost for a feeling, but I think that feeling of not know what I am feeling fits well with The Trial. ( )
  GrlIntrrptdRdng | Jun 28, 2015 |
I get the importance of this story - especially for the time and place where it was written but frankly, for me this was a real slog. Reminiscent in style to Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita, (another book I did not really care for), the narrative follows the doomed Josef K. as he is arrested and put on trial. But the proceedings are exceptionally surreal and the story is populated with many odd characters with whom I found it difficult to empathize. As a result, I was not amused or entertained. For me, that equates to a fail. ( )
  ScoLgo | Jun 4, 2015 |
Uma terrível viagem psicológica à vida de Josef K., um homem comum que acorda um dia e se vê acusado de um crime que não cometeu, um crime cuja natureza nunca lhe é revelada. Uma vez preso, é libertado, mas deve retornar ao tribunal a uma base regular - uma série de eventos que se mostra enlouquecedora, pois nada é resolvido. À medida em que cresce a incerteza de seu destino, sua vida pessoal - incluindo o trabalho num banco e suas relações com a senhoria e uma jovem mulher que mora ao lado - torna-se cada vez mais imprevisível. K. tenta ganhar o controle, mas só consegue acelerar sua própria e excruciante espiral descendente. Dá prova do gênio de Kafka, como um romancista, um humorista, um psicólogo e um humorista, a sua dialética do absurdo, que jamais deixa a peteca da parábola cair. Cada tipo de gesto humano e cada detalhe realista são esmiuçados conforme aquela dialética do absurdo. ( )
  jgcorrea | Apr 24, 2015 |
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» Add other authors (654 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kafka, Franzprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Parry, IdrisTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brod, MaxEpiloguesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brod, MaxEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butler, E. M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cober, Alan E.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ferrater, GabrielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fosshag, BengtIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hermsdorf, KlausAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Koch, Hans-GerdEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kurpershoek, TheoCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lambourne, NigelPhotogrammessecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mitchell, BreonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muir, EdwinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muir, WillaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nahuys, Alice vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oldenburg, PeterCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Salter, GeorgeIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simojoki, AukustiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zampa, GiorgioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Someone must have been telling lies about Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning.
Jemand mußte Josef K. verleumdet haben, denn ohne daß er etwas Böses getan hätte, wurde er eines Morgens verhaftet.
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Original German title: Der Prozess
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0805209999, Paperback)

The story of The Trial's publication is almost as fascinating as the novel itself. Kafka intended his parable of alienation in a mysterious bureaucracy to be burned, along with the rest of his diaries and manuscripts, after his death in 1924. Yet his friend Max Brod pressed forward to prepare The Trial and the rest of his papers for publication. When the Nazis came to power, publication of Jewish writers such as Kafka was forbidden; Kafka's writings, many of which have distinctively Jewish themes, did not find a broad audience until after World War II. (Hannah Arendt once observed that although "during his lifetime he could not make a decent living, [Kafka] will now keep generations of intellectuals both gainfully employed and well-fed.") Among the current crop of Kafka heirs is Breon Mitchell, the translator of this edition of The Trial. Rather than tidying up Kafka's unconventional grammar and punctuation (as previous translators have done), Mitchell captures the loose, uneasy, even uncomfortable constructions of Kafka's original story. His translation technique is the only way to convey the comedy and confusion of this narrative, in which Josef K., "without having done anything truly wrong," is arrested, tried, convicted and executed--on a charge that is never disclosed to him. --Michael Joseph Gross

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:13 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

A new edition of Kafka's classic work--certain to become the new standard.

(summary from another edition)

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Audible.com

6 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141182903, 0141194715

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