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Traitor's Moon (1999)

by Lynn Flewelling

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Nightrunner (3)

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1,492208,655 (4.03)33
Wounded heroes of a cataclysmic battle, Seregil and Alec have spent the past two years in self-imposed exile, far from their adopted homeland, Skala, and the bitter memories there. But as the war rages on, their time of peace is shattered by a desperate summons from Queen Idrilain, asking them to aid her daughter on a mission to Aurenen, the very land from which Seregil was exiled in his youth. Here, in this fabled realm of magic and honor, he must at last confront the demons of his dark past, even as Alec discovers an unimagined heritage. And caught between Skala's desperate need and the ancient intrigues of the Aurenfaie, they soon find themselves snared in a growing web of treachery and betrayal.… (more)
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» See also 33 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
With just as much political intrigue, and character development as the previous two installments of Lynn Flewelling's Nightrunner Series, this third book did not disappoint.
I loved that this novel took us to a new land in Flewelling's world, and allowed us a deeper dive into Seregil's mind and past. It was a nice change of pace from the previous two novels, and took the series in a newer direction. It was refreshing to see a newer side to Seregil than the previous books had shown.
This installment to the series is definitely a much slower paced story, and dealt far more with the political side then the nightrunner side, and that in the end was where it faltered for me in comparison. I appreciated the story and the character development, but the entire time I longed for Alec and Seregil to do what they do best. The reason I fell in love with the series was the whole concept of the Watchers and their nightrunning adventures. In this book they were too far and few between, and it felt somewhat lacking for that.
The other part that really upset me, was that we never got to see Alec and Seregil's relationship grow. The end of book 2 has them realizing their feelings and book 3 picks up 2 years later when they are fully realized and they are now lovers. I felt cheated. As invested as I am in the two characters I would have loved to have watched that relationship grow and develop, rather then just picking up with them already have figured it all out.
Though I really wanted to read about the development it didn't take away from the novel itself, and in the end is just a personal complaint.
Overall, this felt like a strong addition to the series that pushed the narrative forward, and builds on the world and characters Flewelling has so endeared me to. Still one of my favorite fantasy series I have read to date. ( )
  Kiddboyblue | Jun 20, 2018 |
Hoping the author takes the advice of her friends that she refers to in the dedication. Write a "serious novel" instead of more installments of these Nightrunner books.

I really enjoyed the 1st two books, but this last one became a know of silly multi-syllabic & nonsensical words strung together. ( )
  josh513 | Feb 3, 2018 |
The third book in the Nightrunner series, Traitor's Moon is a slight departure from the previous two. The previous two books were focused on various plot threads, spying, mysteries, etc... This one sets a completely different pace. For one thing, it takes place, for the most part in Seregil's home country of Aurenen, and there is a fair amount of political hand-holding, though there is a slight bit of mystery. The backbone of this story isn't in the action, it's in the connection with the characters and in getting a deeper understanding of the intricacies of the Aurenfaie, the different clans and how they value things like Honor and truth, and how they interact with one another.

We also learn the true circumstances behind not only Seregil's exile, but Alec's birth, though I suspect there is more to the story of the Hazadrielfaie's exodus from Aurenen than we have learned thus far. Not to mention the the strange prediction telling Alec he would "father a child of no woman". All mysterious things that I think we won't see answers for just yet.

I also I liked Nyal and was pleased to see Beka find someone. Thero grew on me a lot in this book. In the previous two books I didn't *dislike* him exactly, but I wasn't overly fond of him either. We also see more of Klia and Beka's Turma

Still, overall I enjoyed this book quite a lot, just in a different way than the previous two. ( )
  saohicwitch | Apr 21, 2016 |
Traitor’s Moon is the third book in the Nightrunner series, however it is a stand alone that the author says can be read independently. If you want to start from the first book, look at Luck in the Shadows. This installment is more diplomacy and political machinations than the prior novels. Skala has not been fairing well in the war, and Alec and Seregil are recruited on a diplomatic mission to Aurenen to request aid.

My major problem with Traitor’s Moon lay in the pacing. This is a 540 page novel, and it took 300 pages for me to get truly into the book and excited about what was going on. Because of this, it took me much longer to read than normal, since for a long while I was only picking up Traitor’s Moon during wait times before classes and such. It didn’t help that the book involved a ton of characters and made up fantasy words (with apostrophes!) and didn’t have a glossary.

As I’ve mentioned in my reviews of the first two books, I’m a bit iffy about the age difference in Seregil and Alec’s relationship. I know it’s a very common trope, but it’s not one I like. There was a two year time gap between books, so thankfully Alec was eighteen for the events of this book.

Seregil is an emotional wreak for a lot of this book since going back to Aurenen is bringing up all sorts of bad memories and emotions. I tend to like when the protagonists are a complete mess, so this was actually one of my favorite aspects of the book. It also helped me warm up to Seregil again since it’d been over a year since I’d read the second book.

I don’t know if I’ll go forward with this series. I feel like I spent too much time slogging through the beginning of the book, and from what I remember of the first two, that’s not an isolated incident. I like the characters, but I don’t feel invested enough to keep reading purely for their sake.

Originally posted on The Illustrated Page. ( )
  pwaites | Apr 4, 2016 |
Not quite as good as the first two in this series. I'm sure fans will still love it, but I found it a bit tedious.
It's quite long - 540 pages, and the great majority of that involves the characters sitting around during pointless political negotiations that seem to be going nowhere. (the kingdom of Skala, at war with neighboring Plenimar, needs access to the forbidden land of the Aurenen - specifically, their ports - in order to gain a military advantage.)
Finally, things pick up when some people start getting killed - but then it falls into typical murder-mystery tropes, and Seregil starts acting more like Sherlock Holmes than one would expect.

I'm not ruling out reading more of this series at some point in the future, but I feel like three books is enough for me, for the time being. ( )
  AltheaAnn | Feb 9, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
added by gsc55 | editRainbow Gold Reviews (Nov 10, 2014)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lynn Flewellingprimary authorall editionscalculated
Meier, Fraukesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ruddell, GaryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sinclair, JamesMap makersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For our folks, Thelma and Win White and Frances Flewelling, for their continuing love and support. I promise I'll write you that serious novel one of these days! Thanks for liking these so much.
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The sleet-laden wind buffeted Magyana, whipping wet strands free from the wizard's thick white braid as she trudged across the churned ground of the battlefield.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wounded heroes of a cataclysmic battle, Seregil and Alec have spent the past two years in self-imposed exile, far from their adopted homeland, Skala, and the bitter memories there. But as the war rages on, their time of peace is shattered by a desperate summons from Queen Idrilain, asking them to aid her daughter on a mission to Aurenen, the very land from which Seregil was exiled in his youth. Here, in this fabled realm of magic and honor, he must at last confront the demons of his dark past, even as Alec discovers an unimagined heritage. And caught between Skala's desperate need and the ancient intrigues of the Aurenfaie, they soon find themselves snared in a growing web of treachery and betrayal.

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Seregil and Alec have spent the last two years in self-imposed exile, far from their adopted homeland, Skala, and the bitter memories there. But their time of peace is shattered by a desperate summons from Queen Idrilain, asking them to aid her daughter on a mission to Aurenen, the very land from which Seregil was exiled in his youth
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