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Maurice: A Novel by E. M. Forster
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Maurice: A Novel

by E. M. Forster

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,101482,677 (3.97)112
  1. 20
    A Passage to India by E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: The man is brilliant! One should read all of his books!
  2. 10
    A Month in the Country by J. L. Carr (1502Isabella)
  3. 10
    The Charioteer by Mary Renault (emanate28)
    emanate28: Understated, loving, and in a way heartbreaking depiction of love between two men in repressive British society.
  4. 10
    Why We Never Danced the Charleston by Harlan Greene (lucybrown)
    lucybrown: Both books examine young men coming to terms with their homosexuality in a time period when it was entirely unaccepted, even illegal. Forster's book is set in the late Victorian England (1914)and Greene's 1920s Charleston, SC. Both are well written though stylistically different.… (more)
  5. 10
    The Obelisk by E. M. Forster (DitisSuzanne)
  6. 00
    Tell it to the Bees by Fiona Shaw (MinaKelly)
  7. 00
    The Lost Language of Cranes by David Leavitt (Booksloth)
  8. 11
    Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin (jonathankws)
  9. 00
    Stalky & Co. by Rudyard Kipling (aulsmith)
    aulsmith: Maurice is kind of a Stalky grown-up to be gay.
  10. 00
    Simple Man: The Autobiography of Peter West by Ruadhán J. McElroy (youngsoulrebel)
  11. 01
    Confessions of a Mask by Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Another LGBT Bildungsroman
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» See also 112 mentions

English (45)  French (1)  Italian (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (48)
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
Maurice was my first novel by Forster. I do not recall how I initially came across but it was on my to-be-read (TBR) list for a while. When the Book Cougars (https://www.bookcougars.com) chose it as a group read, I was happy to join their discussion. I gave it a high rating for the writing and its timeless appeal.

Maurice is about young love between two young men in the early 1900s. Given the timeframe, such a relationship was controversial. Clive Durham represented a composite of realistic responses to homosexuality. He managed to evoke an emotional response from me. Clive's attitude is still present in our society and it infuriates me.

I tried to empathize with Maurice, the title character. During a discussion with his sister, Maurice did upset me with his retort, “Nurses are not nice. No nice girl would be a nurse. If they are you may be sure they do not come from nice homes, or they would stop at home". I had to calm myself with the reminder that nursing has come a long way.

My own experience is an example of the change in nursing. My heartfelt thanks to my instructors in nursing school for setting a positive tone. They stressed treating every patient as human regardless of age, religion, criminal background or sexual preference. Advice worth sharing in every profession. ( )
  godmotherx5 | Apr 5, 2018 |
  gsc55 | Jul 9, 2017 |
Written between 1913 and 1914, Forster’s novel of a young man’s awakening homosexuality was not published until 1971, a year after the author’s death. The novel caused a sensation when it was released, not just because of the subject matter, but because Forster dared to write a “happy ending.”

Still, there is much distress for Maurice as he comes to terms with his “inclinations” and struggles to form a relationship that will be honest and true. But then, many a heterosexual young person also struggles to find true love and acceptance.

I loved the way that Forster developed this character, showing Maurice’s confusion and naivete as a young man at boarding school, his headlong reckless nature as he pursued his pleasure and found first love, his despair when he thought all was lost and felt compelled to “find a cure” for his condition, and his eventual awakening to the possibilities that a mature and loving relationship might offer him.

I was appalled by some of the attitudes expressed in the novel, but sadly recognize some of the same behavior in current society. While much has changed in regard to societal attitudes about homosexuality in the hundred years since the book was written, and even in the nearly 50 years since it was first published, there is still hatred and persecution aimed at the members of the GLBT community. ( )
1 vote BookConcierge | May 22, 2017 |
An introspective look into the life of a privileged young man in Edwardian England as he comes to understand and accept his homosexuality. I thought it shared Room with a View's theme of discovering one's self by breaking out of rigid social conventions but treated it in a more serious and personal manner. The ending was surprisingly upbeat considering this was written over a hundred years ago ( )
  wandaly | May 7, 2017 |
"Publishable, but worth it?" Was the question E.M Forster wrote in his own margins of the manuscript of this novel.

My answer is yes. Yes, absolutely, yes.

This is a story of same-sex love in Edwardian times between a man called Maurice (said like Morris) his various relationships and finally the man he falls in love with.

I love Forster's tone in this - he's very witty, his writing is layers and layers of comments on class, and gender, and privilege and it's all very subtle. This book can be quite masculine, quite dark, a little bit bitter and bleak, but there's a warmth to it, and an honesty to it.

This book wasn't published until 1971 - after Forster's death. As a queer woman, it makes me wonder what other books were written throughout history and never published, because they had a theme of same-sex love.

This book is an absolute triumph - even its 1987 film adaption with a very young Rupert Graves, Hugh Grant and James Wilby is brilliant.

You should definitely give this book a try. You'll be surprised. ( )
1 vote lydia1879 | Aug 31, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
added by gsc55 | editBoys in our Books, Ilhelm (Feb 19, 2015)
 
added by gsc55 | editSinfully Sexy, Mark (Jan 8, 2014)
 
Includes link to "new" essay
added by gsc55 | editBand of Thebes, Laurence Scott (Jul 7, 2013)
 
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Once a term the whole school went for a walk - that is to say the three masters took part as well as all the boys.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393310329, Paperback)

"The work of an exceptional artist working close to the peak of his powers." Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times

Set in the elegant Edwardian world of Cambridge undergraduate life, this story by a master novelist introduces us to Maurice Hall when he is fourteen. We follow him through public school and Cambridge, and on into his father's firm, Hill and Hall, Stock Brokers. In a highly structured society, Maurice is a conventional young man in almost every way, "stepping into the niche that England had prepared for him": except that his is homosexual. Written during 1913 and 1914, immediately after Howards End, and not published until 1971, Maurice was ahead of its time in its theme and in its affirmation that love between men can be happy. "Happiness," Forster wrote, "is its keynote. In Maurice I tried to create a character who was completely unlike myself or what I supposed myself to be: someone handsome, healthy, bodily attractive, mentally torpid, not a bad businessman and rather a snob. Into this mixture I dropped an ingredient that puzzles him, wakes him up, torments him and finally saves him."

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:08 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

"The work of an exceptional artist working close to the peak of his powers."--Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, New York Times Set in the elegant Edwardian world of Cambridge undergraduate life, this story by a master novelist introduces us to Maurice Hall when he is fourteen. We follow him through public school and Cambridge, and on into his father's firm, Hill and Hall, Stock Brokers. In a highly structured society, Maurice is a conventional young man in almost every way, "stepping into the niche that England had prepared for him": except that his is homosexual. Written during 1913 and 1914, immediately after Howards End, and not published until 1971, Maurice was ahead of its time in its theme and in its affirmation that love between men can be happy. "Happiness," Forster wrote, "is its keynote ... In Maurice I tried to create a character who was completely unlike myself or what I supposed myself to be: someone handsome, healthy, bodily attractive, mentally torpid, not a bad businessman and rather a snob. Into this mixture I dropped an ingredient that puzzles him, wakes him up, torments him and finally saves him." Written during 1913 and 1914, Maurice deals with the then unmentionable subject of homosexuality. More unusual, it concerns a relationship that ends happily.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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